Nord - Ostsee kanal (former Kaiser Wilhelm Canal)


The original Canal, the Eider Canal, was built in 1784, but was eventually deemed too shallow to accommodate the increasing number of larger vessels. The Kiel Canal was completed in 1895. Built by Germany before World War I, the canal allowed the German Navy to move from Baltic Bases to the open sea without travelling through international waters.

The Kiel Canal

(German: Nord-Ostsee-Kanal, literally "North-[to]-Baltic Sea canal", formerly known as the Kaiser-Wilhelm-Kanal) is a 98-kilometre (61 mi) long freshwater canal in the German state of Schleswig-Holstein. The canal was finished in 1895, but later widened, and links the North Sea at Brunsbüttel to the Baltic Sea at Kiel-Holtenau. An average of 250 nautical miles (460 km) is saved by using the Kiel Canal instead of going around the Jutland Peninsula. This not only saves time but also avoids storm-prone seas and having to pass through the Sound or Belts.

Besides its two sea entrances, the Kiel Canal is linked, at Oldenbüttel, to the navigable River Eider by the short Gieselau Canal.

History

The first connection between the North and Baltic Seas was constructed while the area was ruled by Denmark-Norway. It was called the Eider Canal, which used stretches of the Eider River for the link between the two seas. Completed during the reign of Christian VII of Denmark in 1784, the Eiderkanal was a 43-kilometre part of a 175-kilometre waterway from Kiel to the Eider River's mouth at Tönning on the west coast. It was only 29 metres wide with a depth of 3 metres (10 ft), which limited the vessels that could use the canal to 300 tonnes.

After 1864 Second Schleswig War put Schleswig-Holstein under the government of Prussia (from 1871 the German Empire), a new canal was sought by merchants and by the German navy, which wanted to link its bases in the Baltic and the North Sea without the need to sail around Denmark.

In June 1887, construction started at Holtenau, near Kiel. The canal took over 9,000 workers eight years to build. On 20 June 1895 the canal was officially opened by Kaiser Wilhelm II for transiting from Brunsbüttel to Holtenau. The next day, a ceremony was held in Holtenau, where Wilhelm II named it the Kaiser Wilhelm Kanal (after his grandfather, Kaiser Wilhelm I), and laid the final stone.[3] The opening of the canal was filmed by British director Birt Acres; surviving footage of this early film is preserved in the Science Museum in London.

The first Trans-Atlantic sailing ship to pass through the canal was Lilly, commanded by Johan Pitka. Lilly. a barque, was a wooden sailing ship of about 390 tons built 1866 in Sunderland, U.K. She had a length of 127.5 ft., beam 28.7 ft., depth of 17.6 ft and a 32-ft keel.

Widening (1907–1914

In order to meet the increasing traffic and the demands of the Imperial German Navy, between 1907 and 1914 the canal width was increased. The widening of the canal allowed the passage of a Dreadnought-sized battleship. This meant that these battleships could travel from the Baltic Sea to the North Sea without having to go around Denmark. The enlargement projects were completed by the installation of two larger canal locks in Brunsbüttel and Holtenau.

After World War I, the Treaty of Versailles required the canal to be open to vessels of commerce and of war of any nation at peace with Germany, while leaving it under German administration. (It must be noted here that the United States rejected this proposal because it would have given other powers – notably Great Britain and France – an excuse to seek similar concessions on the Panama Canal. Even pre–World War I Germany had floated such a proposal.) The government under Adolf Hitler repudiated its international status in 1936. After World War II the canal was reopened to all traffic. In 1948, the current name was adopted.

The canal was partially closed in March 2013 after two lock gates failed at the western end near Brunsbüttel. Ships larger than 125 metres were forced to navigate via Skagerrak, a 450-kilometre detour. The failure was blamed on neglect and a lack of funding by the German Federal Government which has been in financial dispute with the state of Schleswig-Holstein regarding the canal. Germany's Transport Ministry promised rapid repairs.

Operation

There are detailed traffic rules for the canal. Each vessel in passage is classified in one of six traffic groups according to its dimensions. Larger ships are obliged to accept pilots and specialised canal helmsmen, in some cases even the assistance of a tugboat. Furthermore, there are regulations regarding the passing of oncoming ships. Larger ships may also be required to moor at the bollards provided at intervals along the canal to allow the passage of oncoming vessels. Special rules apply to pleasure craft.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Dimensions:
Length: 98,637 km
Width at the waterline: 162 m (partly 102,5 m)
Width at the bottom: 90 m (partly 44 m)
Water depth: 11 m
Maximum size of the ship passing the Canal is 235.0 m long and 32.5 m breadth. 40.0 m above the water level. In the New Locks maximum length are 310m and width 42m and in the Old Locks 125m length and 22m width

The Canal has a water deep of 11m and the Canal is 103m wide and 162m where the Canal is widened. Maximum size of ships passing the Canal is a length of 235m and 32.5m wide. Max height is 40m. Maximum draft is 9.5m for ships not exceeding 160m in length and 20m in beam. For ships 235m long and a beam of 32.5m maximum draft is 7m.


The KIEL-CANAL is the most heavily used man made seaway in the world. Excluding sporting boats and other small boats, an average of 105 ships per day used the canal in 2002.

The Kiel Canal connects the North Sea and the Baltic Sea. The Canal goes between Brunsbüttel at the river Elbe and Holtenau in Kiel. When coming from the North Sea we have to enter the River Elbe. It's the river that goes up to Hamburg. Its 78 Nautical miles from Elbe pilot to Hamburg and about 41 NM to Brunsbüttel.

The Canal is 98,7 km long and it takes about 8-10 hours to pass depending on the traffic. Sometimes we have to stop and wait for ships coming in the Canal. There are sidings in the Canal where big ships can meet.

On these sidings the Canal is widened and there are mooring dolphins and signal stations. Maximum speed in the Canal is 6,5 knots (12km/h) for ships in traffic group 6 or ships with draft more than 8,5m. For other vessels it's 8,1 knots (15km/h).

Map of the Kiel Canal

Map of the Kiel Canal
Click HERE for full size map

To be able to control the traffic the vessels are categorized in to 6 traffic groups according to their size and potential danger. The ship have to exhibit different signals depending on the "traffic group" the ship belongs to.

Traffic group 1
Vessels 45.0 m in length with breadth 9,5m or 55.0 m in length and 8.5 m in breadth. Max 3.1 m in draught.

Traffic group 2
Vessels 65.0 m in length with breadth 13 m or 85.0 m in length and 11 m in breadth. Max 3.7 m in draught.

Traffic group 3
Vessels 120.0 m in length with breadth 17.0 m or 140.0 m in length and 19.0 m in breadth. Max 6.1 m in draught. Dangerous vessels having the dimensions of traffic groups 1 or 2.

Traffic group 4
Vessels 130.0 m in length with breadth 23.0 m or 160.0 m in length and 20.0 m in breadth. Max 9.5 m in draught. Dangerous vessels having the dimensions of traffic groups 3.

Traffic group 5
Vessels 200.0 m in length with breadth 28.0 m or 210.0 m in length and 27.0 m in breadth. Max 9.5 m in draught. Dangerous vessels having the dimensions of traffic group 4.
For vessels up to 160 m in length, the maximum permitted draught is 9.50 m. When a ship is more than 160m the maximum permitted draught reduces with increasing length and breadth of the ship.

9.5m is maximum draught and a ship that's 235m long and with a breadth of 32.5m are allowed to have maximum 7m draught

Traffic group 6
All vessels which do not belong to any other group.


German Traffic Regulations for Navigable Mari-time Waterways
Signals to identify the ship's traffic group
From the German Traffic Regulations for Navigable Mari-time Waterways

Kiel Canal
m/t Tärnvåg displaying a CYLINER and a BALL, day light signal for a group #5 ship
Photo taken August 2004 on board m/t Framnäs

German Traffic Regulations for Navigable Mari-time Waterways
Group 1 to 4 should have a yellow light to show that they don't have any pilot on board
From the German Traffic Regulations for Navigable Mari-time Waterways

Kiel Canal
Meeting a ship with a yellow light below forward mast head light. And we know there is no Pilot on board
Photo taken August 2004 on board m/t Framnäs

Kiel Canal
Green light and we know that it is a Group #4 ship
Photo taken August 2004 on board m/t Framnäs


Kiel Canal - Brunsbüttel Lock
Approaching the Brunsbüttel lock from Elbe
Photo taken in the summer of 1990 on board Westön

Kiel Canal - Brunsbüttel Lock
Entering the lock in Brunsbüttel from Elbe
Photo taken February 2003 on board Vinga Helena

Kiel Canal - Brunsbüttel Lock
Entering the lock in Brunsbüttel from Elbe
Photo taken February 2003 on board Vinga Helena

Kiel Canal - Brunsbüttel Lock
Kiosk in Brunsbüttel

Kiel Canal - Brunsbüttel Lock
Entering the lock in Brunsbüttel from Canal side. River Elbe on the other side of the lock
Photo taken February 2003 on board m/t Vinga Helena

Kiel Canal - Brunsbüttel Lock
Entering the lock in Brunsbüttel from Canal side. River Elbe on the other side of the lock
Photo taken February 2003 on board m/t Vinga Helena

Kiel Canal - Brunsbüttel Lock
Entering the lock in Brunsbüttel from Canal side. River Elbe on the other side of the lock
Photo taken February 2003 on board m/t Vinga Helena

Kiel Canal - Brunsbüttel Lock
Ships in the Brunsbüttel lock
Photo taken February 2003 on board m/t Vinga Helena

Entering Brunsbüttel lock with m/t Framnäs
13 August 2004

On each side of the Canal there are locks and they consists of 2 sets of locks, Neue Schleusen and Alte Schleusen. New and old locks. Each lock has 2 chambers side by side and there is a small island between the new and old lock.

Between the chambers in the new locks there is a kiosk where it's possible to buy candy, ice cream, newspaper and stuff. The shop in Brunsbüttel lock was much bigger than the one in Holtenau (Kiel side of the Canal) Last time I was in the Canal the kiosks was closed, so obviously Ice cream in the Kiel Canalit is no good business anymore. They were expensive, but it was nice with a break to get ice cream etc.

There are also ship chandlers in the locks. Before arriving to the lock we call the ship chandler and he deliver when we are in the lock. They use small electrical trucks to deliver the provision. They are very quiet, so you need to watch out when you walk around in the lock area.

It takes a few minutes to walk to the kiosk if we are staying at the same side as the kiosk in the lock. Otherwise we will have to walk along the lock to the gate that is closed and cross the lock to get to the kiosk. There is always one gate closed so you can cross to get to the kiosk and your ice-cream. Yet another Smiley on www.aladdin.stThen we're talking 5 to 10 minutes’ walk.

Most of the times there is time to visit the kiosk. But I guess the sailors have lost interest as the kiosks both end are closed. Back in the days it was business 24/7.

Kiel Canal
Kiosk in Brunsbüttel

Kiel Canal
One new crew member waiting in the Holtenau lock (Kiel side of the Canal) to sign on
We can also see one of the electric trucks they use to deliver stores with.
Photo taken July 2003 on board CT Star

Kiel Canal
Kiosk in the Holtenau lock (Kiel side of the Canal)
Photo taken August 2003 on board CT Star

Kiel Canal
Crew going ashore to buy candy in the Holtenau lock (Kiel side of the Canal)
Photo taken July 2003 on board CT Star


In Brunsbüttel Swedish Seaman's church has a room and they use to have Swedish newspaper there and we can go there and pick them up. Good service. I remember back in the day s when MIF was in hockey final against, well, I think it was some team from Stockholm.

I had much good news from the Swedish Seaman's Church service at the lock in Brunsbüttel as MIF won every game and ended up as Swedish Champions. And yes, it was very exciting to approach the locks in Brunsbüttel back then. There is a signal system used in the locks so the pilot know which lock he should use and what side we will stay in the lock. Well, we already know before arriving to the lock. Pilot has been speaking with the lock on the radio. The pilot can make arrangements if we want to have any special side alongside for filling FW and stuff.


Entering the locks and there are signals showing us what side to berth on etc. Of course, we never mind the signals as the Pilot know this and he is in constant radio contact with the lock for instructions. Anyway, as no surprise the red light means no entry. Red and white means that they are preparing the lock. Green and white light indicates on which side we will make fast.

Signal on the picture below shows that both chambers (in the new lock) are ready to be entered and ship will make fast at center wall. I use to call it kiosk side alongside because the kiosk is situated between the 2 chambers in both Holtenau and Brunsbüttel.

Kiel Canal - CT Star
Entering the lock
Make fast at the centre wall - The other chamber, green and white light, make fast on the side wall
Pictures taken on board m/t CT Star 17 August 2003

Kiel Canal - Vinga Helena
Entering the lock
Green light, gate is open and the white light shows that we have to make fast on the side wall
and thus we need to walk across the gate to reach the kiosk between the locks.
And the gate is closed to the right hand lock, and thus the signal shows red
Photo taken February 2003 on board m/t Vinga Helena

German Traffic Regulations for Navigable Mari-time Waterways
Signals entering locks in the Kiel Canal
From the German Traffic Regulations for Navigable Mari-time Waterways

The “German Traffic Regulations for Navigable Mari-time Waterways” 2017 is issued by the Federal Maritime and Hydrographic Agency - Bundesamt für Seeschifffahrt und Hydrographie Federal Maritime and Hydrographic Agency - Bundesamt für Seeschifffahrt und Hydrographie(BSH) - Can be down loaded HERE. I had much help from them and their web page when I did my German certificates back in 2004 or when ever it was.

It was along time ago and you can read all about the adventure in Hamburg and Kiel HERE.

The Federal Maritime and Hydrographic Agency of Germany

(German: Bundesamt für Seeschifffahrt und Hydrographie, BSH) is a German federal authority based in Hamburg and Rostock. With some 800 employees, the agency's tasks include maritime safety, hydrographic survey, maritime pollution monitoring, and approvals of offshore installations.

The Federal Maritime and Hydrographic Agency provides maritime services for shipping, economy and marine environment. It is a federal agency within the portfolio of the Federal Ministry of Transport, Building and Urban Development. The various tasks include:

• Facilitation of the German merchant marine,

• Tonnage measurement and matter related to flags of convenience,

• Issue of certificates for sailors,

• Testing and approval of navigational and radio equipment,

• Maritime hazard control,

• Issue of official nautical charts, handbooks and other nautical publications such as notice to mariners for professional and recreational shipping,

• Bathymetry of North Sea and Baltic Sea,

• Calculation and forecasts of tide tables, water levels and storm tides,

• Monitoring of the marine environment which includes the operation of several fixed automated stations,

• Investigation of environmental pollution at sea,

• Maritime spatial planning for the exclusive economic zone (EEZ) of Germany,

Approval of commercial offshore activities like wind farming, pipelines or submarine communications cables in the German EEZ of North Sea and Baltic. The agency is moreover represented in a number of national and international panels.

The head office of Federal Bureau for Maritime Casualty Investigation is in the BSH facility.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Kiel Canal
Steaming towards Brunsbüttel lock
Photo taken February 2003 on board Vinga Helena

Kiel Canal
Steaming towards Brunsbüttel lock
Photo taken February 2003 on board Vinga Helena

Kiel Canal
Steaming towards Brunsbüttel lock
Photo taken February 2003 on board Vinga Helena

Kiel Canal
Meeting m/t Bonito when we're leaving Brunsbüttel lock
Photo taken July 2003 on board CT Star

Pilot is compulsory for all ships passing the Kiel Canal with a length of more than 45m and 9.5 m beam and a draft of 3.1m. (traffic group 2 and upwards). Helmsmen (a helmsman steer the ship) are compulsory for vessels exceeding 100m in length and 15.5m in breadth and 6.1 m draft or 115m in length and 14m in breadth and 6.1 m draft. They provide us with 2 helmsmen that take turn at the wheel during the passage.

The stay on board during the whole passage but we change pilot half way. The Canal is divided into 2 pilotage districts, 1 west and 1 east of Rüsterberger, about half way through the Canal. Before we had to change pilot at Schülp siding. They built a new pilot station Rüsterbergen between Schülp siding and Breiholz siding. I don't remember what year it was, but it was during the 1990s. Mid or end of the 90's and I really couldn't find any info on the internet.

So now the pilots have a nice pilot station. The Pilots say that this pilot station is much better than the old one. There are beds for the pilot so they can sleep while waiting for ships.

Kiel Canal -  Rüsterbergen Pilot Station
Changing Pilot at Rüsterbergen Pilot Station
Photo taken February 2009 on board m/t Ek-River

Kiel Canal -  Rüsterbergen Pilot Station
Changing Pilot at Rüsterbergen Pilot Station
Photo taken February 2009 on board m/t Ek-River

Kiel Canal -  Rüsterbergen Pilot Station
Rüsterbergen Pilot Station
Photo taken February 2009 on board m/t Ek-River

Kiel Canal - Rüsterbergen Pilot Station
Rüsterbergen Pilot Station in the summer
Photo taken July 2003 on board CT Star

Kiel Canal - Schülp Pilot Station
Changing pilot at the old Pilot Station - Schülp Pilot Station
We can see that it is an old picture. The pilot boat is an old model at Schülp Pilot Station
Photo taken in the summer of 1993 on board m/t Bituma

Kiel Canal - Schülp Pilot Station
Changing pilot at the old Pilot Station - Schülp Pilot Station
We can see that it is an old picture. The pilot boat is an old model at Schülp Pilot Station
Photo taken in the summer of 1993 on board m/t Bituma

Kiel Canal -  Rüsterbergen Pilot Station
Changing Pilot at Rüsterbergen Pilot Station
Photo taken May 2003 on board m/t CT Star

Kiel Canal -  Rüsterbergen Pilot Station
Changing Pilot at Rüsterbergen Pilot Station
Photo taken May 2003 on board m/t CT Star

Kiel Canal -  Rüsterbergen Pilot Station
Changing Pilot in the night
Photo taken August 2004 on board m/t Framnäs

We change pilots in Rüsterbergen Pilot Station and if we were lucky the pilots changed on deck. Then we only need to go down from the bridge one time. Bring down the pilot and back up with the new pilot. I think the rules are that they should change on the bridge.

Then we need to go down to pick up the new pilot, they hand over on the bridge and you will have to bring down the old pilot to deck so he can disembark.

Brieholz Pilot Station
During my bicycle holiday August 2018

1 time long ago when we passed a ship secured alongside a jetty in Brunsbüttel, the pilot told me that the ship was waiting for tug boats to tow her out of the Canal. Too much draft to be able to pass the Kiel Canal so Captain had lied about the draft in order to be able to pass through the Canal and thus saving time on the way to the Baltic Sea. Well, they found out about it and they stopped the ship in Brunsbüttel. They had to tow her (very expensive) back out on Elbe. Then she had to go back out on Elbe and around Denmark.

Well, heavy fines, pilot fees and tug boats. Not to mention the waste of many many hours. I'm sure someone received the "Captain of the year" award in that company. Last idiot isn't born yet.

There are 12 sidings (passing places) in the Canal where big ships can meet. Actually it's only 10 sidings, 2 of the 12 sidings are the harbour of Holtenau and Brunsbüttel. Well, anyway beginning in Brunsbüttel these sidings are:

• Ostermoor siding

• Kudensee siding

• Dückerswish siding

• Fischerhütte siding

• Oldenbüttel siding

• Breiholtz siding

• Schülp siding

• Audorf-Rade siding

• Köningsförde siding

• Grossnordsee siding

• Schwartenbeck siding


§ 49 Conduct of vessels in front of, and in, sidings
(1) Vessels shall enter sidings expeditiously.

(2) Where one of the visual signs described under Item A.22(b) of Annex I to the present Ordinance is exhibited in a siding, a vessel under a ban on leaving such siding shall, under the existing circumstances, moor to the foremost accessible dolphin lying to the starboard side of the vessel as she would proceed, or stop in its vicinity and leave adequate room for transiting vessels. Only when traffic or weather conditions so require, a vessel may, exceptionally, moor to the foremost accessible dolphin lying to the port side of the vessel as she would proceed.

(3) The sequence of vessels for leaving a given siding shall, as a rule, be governed by the sequence of vessels when entering that siding. When a vessel wishes to overtake another vessel lying moored, in front of herself, in the same row of dolphins and having been authorized to proceed, the persons in command of the two vessels shall bring about an understanding between themselves in accordance with the provisions of Section 23(4) above. This provision shall also apply to cases where vessels entering a given siding wish to overtake other vessels lying moored in that siding in the same direction of traffic and having been authorized to proceed. Sailing past vessels lying moored to dolphins without such vessels being authorized to proceed shall not be regarded as overtaking.

(4) Vessels lying moored to dolphins on their port side shall not depart unless it is certain that no vessels on a through passage nor vessels departing from dolphins on their starboard side will be put at any risk or be impeded.

(5) No vessel shall be permitted to be lying in a siding for any reason other than on account of the prevailing traffic or weather conditions unless upon prior consent by the competent VTS centre.

German Traffic Regulations for Navigable Mari-time Waterways
Signals entering locks in the Kiel Canal

From the “German Traffic Regulations for Navigable Mari-time Waterways” 2017 is issued by the Federal Maritime and Hydrographic Agency - Bundesamt für Seeschifffahrt und Hydrographie (BSH) - Can be down loaded HERE.


Kiel Canal
Meeting m/t Tärnvåg when we leave a siding
Photo taken August 2004 on board m/t Framnäs

Kiel Canal
Meeting m/t Tärnvåg when we leave a siding
Photo taken August 2004 on board m/t Framnäs

Kiel Canal
And we can see that m/t Tärnvåg have a GREEN LIGHT leaving the siding
Photo taken August 2004 on board m/t Framnäs
Kiel Canal signal lights

As seen in German Traffic Regulations for Navigable Mari-time Waterways above there is a signal station at each siding so the ships now if they have to stop and wait for other ships coming down the Kiel Canal. If the signal stations show light signals: Flashing red light means stop and then we have to stop and wait.

There are many signals, not only red and green, i.e. red light over and under a white light means: Departure forbidden for vessels of "traffic group" 2 or above.
Kiel Canal
From the Ship Traffic Optimization for the Kiel Canal. Can be down loaded HERE

Kiel Canal
Entering a siding and the signal shows 2 red lights
- Traffic Group 4 and above are not allowed to pass and have to wait
Photo taken August 2004 on board m/t Framnäs
Kiel Canal signal lights

Kiel Canal
Passing a siding and we can see that we have green light
Photo taken August 2004 on board m/t Framnäs
Kiel Canal signal lights

Several railway lines and federal roads (Autobahnen and Bundesstraßen) cross the canal on eleven fixed links. The bridges have a clearance of 42 metres allowing for ship heights up to 40 metres.

The oldest bridge still in use is the Levensau High Bridge from 1893; however, the bridge will have to be replaced in the course of a canal expansion already underway. In sequence and in the direction of the official kilometre count from west (Brunsbüttel) to east (Holtenau) these crossings are, beginning in Brunsbüttel:

• Brunsbüttel High Bridge, four lane crossing of Bundesstraße 5

• Hochdonn High Bridge of the Marsh Railway

• Hohenhörn High Bridge for Autobahn 23

• Grünental High Bridge for railway line Neumünster-Heide and Bundesstraße 204

• Rendsburg High Bridge for the Neumünster–Flensburg railway, suspended from which is a transporter bridge for local traffic

• Rendsburg pedestrian tunnel

• Kanaltunnel Rendsburg, road tunnel for Bundesstraße 77 (four lanes)

• Rade High Bridge for Autobahn A7

• Levensau High Bridge from 1893 for the Kiel–Flensburg railway and a local road

• New Levensau High Bridge for Bundesstraße 76 (four lanes)

• Holtenau High Bridges, two parallel bridges with three car lanes each as well as pavements for pedestrians and cyclists


Kiel Canal - Holtenau highway bridge
Holtenau High Bridges
Pictures taken on board m/t CT Star 17 August 2003

Rendsburg High Bridge / Rendsburger Hochbrücke

The Rendsburg High Bridge (German: Rendsburger Hochbrücke, officially Eisenbahnhochbrücke Rendsburg) is a railway viaduct on the Neumünster–Flensburg line that also serves as a transporter bridge. The bridge crosses the Kiel Canal at Rendsburg in the German state of Schleswig-Holstein. It is federally owned through the Federal Water and Navigation Administration that also owns and runs the canal.

Previous history
The Kiel Canal (then Kaiser-Wilhelm-Kanal) was built between 1887 and 1895 cutting through existing traffic lines including the railway line between Neumünster and Flensburg for which two parallel swing bridges were built. In 1907 it was decided to enlarge the canal and in the course of this expansion major obstacles were also to be removed.

Main railway lines had right of way over ships on the canal and ships had to stop, losing about half an hour when a train passed. This was considered the major obstacle as the ships were unable to overtake and could pass each other at dedicated enlarged areas so that the traffic on the entire canal was hampered. Especially the navy pressed for a separation of traffic flows as closed bridges could delay flotillas by several hours.

In order to allow the railway line to pass above the canal, the new bridge was to have a clearance of 42 metres over the canal's mean water level. The existing tracks crossed the canal about 7 metres above the canal's water level, so the tracks had to be elevated by about 36.5 metres including additional 1.5 metres to accommodate the thickness of the lower girder. The required maximum incline of 1:150 (one metre gain in altitude per 150 metres distance) made it necessary to build elevated embankments and access bridges of about 5.5 km at each side.

Design and construction
The bridge was erected between 1911 and 1913 to a design by Friedrich Voss (1872–1953) and replaced the earlier swing bridges.

The steel viaduct has a length of 2,486 metres and is supplemented by embankments that bring the overall length of the structure to about 7.5 kilometres. The cantilever main bridge is 317 metres long, has a main span of 140 metres and provides a clearance of 42 metres above the canal's water level.

To serve Rendsburg station, situated at ground level only a couple of hundred metres from the main bridge, the railway line is routed through a large 360-degree loop on the north bank of the canal ("Rendsburg Loop").

The total cost of the construction, including the relocation of railway lines but excluding work related to the elevation of Rendsburg station, was 13.4 million Mark. This figure includes 5.7 million Mark for bridges, 2.7 million Mark for the mounds and 1.3 million Mark for underpasses and the relocation of roads.

Transporter bridge
The "Schwebefähre" (suspension ferry) runs daily every quarter of an hour from early morning until late at night. It covers a distance of 125 metres within 1 1/2 minutes and provides the shortest connection between the municipality of Osterrönfeld and the city of Rendsburg. As this mean of transportation is especially useful to students on their way to school, larger maintenance work that requires suspension of service is coordinated with school holidays.

The gondola is fourteen metres long and six metres wide, and travels six metres above the canal. In recent years the nominal transport capacity has been reduced from six to four automobiles in order to factor in increased car size and weight. While the gondola is equipped with nautical equipment such as radio, radar and life-rafts, there is no prerequisite for the operator to hold a master's license for inland navigation.

During a storm in January 1993, the unmanned and unlit gondola broke loose at night, was blown over the canal and collided with a ship. Both ship and gondola suffered only minor damage.

On 8 January 2016 the transporter bridge collided with general cargo ship Evert Prahm. The transporter bridge was heavily damaged. It was demounted and moved to a shipyard on March 15, 2016 for damage assessment and repairs, which are estimated to take a few months. As of August 2017, the transporter bridge was still not in operation.

Rendsburg Loop


The Rendsburg Loop (German: Rendsburger Schleife) is an elevated spiral railway in Rendsburg in the German state of Schleswig-
Kiel Canal - Rendsburg Loop
Click HERE for bigger map
By Inselmann - Own work

Holstein, connecting the Rendsburg High Bridge over the Kiel Canal on the Neumünster–Flensburg line to Rendsburg station.

Construction
The first bridge built over the original Kiel Canal in the 1890s was a swing bridge. In 1913, with the widening of the canal, this was replaced by the Rendsburg High Bridge with a clearance height of 42 metres. This met the requirements for bridges across the canal.

At the same time, however, it was desirable for trains to be able to use the existing Rendsburg station. This was difficult, because the station was too close to the canal to be connected directly from a bridge over the canal at the minimum height for the bridge.

Therefore, at the northern end of the bridge, an elevated railway was built in the form of a loop. Trains from the south to Rendsburg need to make a 360-degree turn before entering the station. Similarly, trains coming from the north after leaving Rendsburg station run over the loop on to the High Bridge to cross the Kiel Canal.

Schleife district
The district of Rendsburg in which the loop is built is named Schleife after the loop.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


I was in Rendsburg in July 2018 on my bicycle holiday - Kiel Canal by bike - Die Mecklenburger Radtour GmbH and one of the things I wanted to do was to cross the Kiel Canal on the ferry hanging from the Rendsburg High Bridge / Rendsburger Hochbrücke. But the ferry had been hit by a ship and it was no longer operating.

Kiel Canal by bike - Die Mecklenburger Radtour GmbH
Ferry jetty on the other side of the Canal, no longer in use

Kiel Canal by bike - Die Mecklenburger Radtour GmbH
Ferry jetty is no longer in use


A ship, Evert Prahm hit he ferry and 2 people were injured. Read the interim report: Serious Marine Casualty. Collision between the general cargo ship. EVERT PRAHM and the Rendsburg transporter bridge on 8 January 2016 by clicking HERE


I remember one time long time ago when we passed the Canal and there was a ship stuck under one of the bridges. The pilot told me that the ship had passed a few of the bridges and when on the way between 2 bridges they topped one of the booms. They reached max headroom in a jiff and you don't need a diploma of Bachelor in nautical science to understand what's happened when they reached the bridge.

On the railway bridge in Rendsburg there is a ferry hanging in wires from the bridge crossing the Canal a few meters above the water. And just after passing the railway bridge, when on the way to Holtenau, there is a restaurant playing the national hymns of the ships home country. They also salute you with the flag.

Kiel Canal - Rendsburg High Bridge
Approaching Rendsburg
Pictures taken on board m/t Lindfjord spring 1988

Kiel Canal - Rendsburg High Bridge
Approaching Rendsburg High Bridge
Pictures taken on board m/t Lindfjord spring 1988

Kiel Canal - Rendsburg High Bridge
We're lucky and the “hanging” ferry is crossing
Pictures taken on board m/t Lindfjord spring 1988

Crossing the canal in Ostermoor - August 2018

Kiel Canal ferry

Local traffic is also catered for by 14 ferry lines. Most noteworthy is the “hanging ferry” (German: Schwebefähre) beneath the Rendsburg High Bridge. All ferries are run by the Canal Authority and their use is free of charge. They are transporting pedestrians, bicycles and cars across the Kiel Canal.

And the ferries gives you something to look at during tedious transfers on the Kiel Canal. Maybe Yet another Smiley on www.aladdin.steven some beautiful girls among the passengers or among all the people walking along the Kiel Canal in the summer time.

Kiel Canal - Landwehr
We're passing Landwehr ferry crossing
Photo taken December 2009 on board m/t Ek-River

Kiel Canal - Rendsburg High Bridge
We're passing a ferry crossing
Photo taken August 2004 on board m/t Framnäs

Kiel Canal - Rendsburg High Bridge
We're passing a ferry crossing
Photo taken August 2004 on board m/t Framnäs

Kiel Canal
We meet a ship and we see a ferry crossing the Kiel Canal
Photo taken August 2004 on board m/t Framnäs


Burg Ferry crossing
During my bicycle holiday August 2018

Kiel Canal
Night navigation on the Kiel Canal
Photo taken August 2004 on board m/t Framnäs

Kiel Canal
Night navigation on the Kiel Canal
Photo taken August 2004 on board m/t Framnäs

Kiel Canal
In the summer the Kiel Canal is full of pleasure crafts
Photo taken August 2004 on board m/t Framnäs

Kiel Canal
In the summer the Kiel Canal is full of pleasure crafts
Photo taken August 2004 on board m/t Framnäs

The Kiel Canal is open for traffic 24/7 365 days of the year. of course, it have happened that they have closed the canal. An accident and the Canal is blocked for transfer. A quick search on the internet and there are examples of times when they have closed the Kiel Canal

Spiegel Online - Disrepair Forces Closure of Vital Shipping Lane

Maritime Bulletin - Kiel Canal closed for all traffic

gCaptain - Kiel Canal Remains Closed following Ship Collision

I have passed the Kiel Canal with ice, but never so much we couldn't make it. There is always traffic and the ice doesn’t cover the canal. I have never heard of any ice breaker operations in the Kiel Canal.

Kiel Canal
Passing the oil harbour in Brunsbüttel on the way to Holtenau on the Kiel side
Photo taken March 2010 on board m/t Ek-River

Kiel Canal
Photo taken March 2010 on board m/t Ek-River

Kiel Canal
We can see two ships waiting for us in the siding
Photo taken March 2010 on board m/t Ek-River

Kiel Canal - m/t Richard Maersk
Passing a siding
Photo taken May 2013 on board m/t Richard Maersk

Kiel Canal - m/t Bituma
Crew enjoy the afternoon transfering the Kiel Canal
Photo taken summer 1993 on board m/t Bituma

Kiel Canal
Passing through a beautiful winter landscape
Photo taken December 2009 on board m/t Ek-River

Kiel Canal
Passing through a beautiful winter landscape
Photo taken December 2009 on board m/t Ek-River

Kiel Canal
Meeting m/v Tinto - The signal showing green
Photo taken February 2003 on board m/t Vinga Helena

Kiel Canal - Holtenau locks
Approach the locks in Holtenau
The New Locks to the right and the small Old Locks to the left
Pictures taken on board CT Star 17 August 2003

Kiel Canal - Holtenau locks
Approach the locks in Holtenau
Pictures taken on board CT Star 17 August 2003

Kiel Canal - Holtenau locks
Approach the locks in Holtenau
Pictures taken on board CT Star 17 August 2003

Kiel Canal - Holtenau locks
In the Holtenau locks
Pictures taken on board CT Star 17 August 2003

Kiel Canal - Holtenau locks
In the Holtenau locks
We can see that the ships coming in to the lock (left hand side)
are higher than us as we're down to sea level (low water)
Pictures taken on board CT Star 17 August 2003

Kiel Canal - Holtenau locks
Meeting m/t Margarita when we approach Holtenau locks
Passing the old locks coming out from Holtenau locks
Pictures taken on board Ternvik 13 May 2011

Kiel Canal - m/t Margarita
Meeting m/t Margarita when we approach Holtenau locks
Pictures taken on board Ternvik 13 May 2011

Kiel Canal - m/t Margarita
Meeting m/t Margarita when we approach Holtenau locks
Pictures taken on board Ternvik 13 May 2011

Kiel Canal - Ternvik
Entering Holtenau locks with m/t Ternvik
We can see the small “cross canal” ferry Adler 1
Pictures taken on board Ternvik 13 May 2011

Kiel Canal - Ternvik
m/t Ternvik in Holtenau locks
We can see that the shop is on the other side of the lock and we had to cross walking over the lock gates
Pictures taken on board Ternvik 13 May 2011

It's always nice to leave the Kiel Canal behind, well, maybe not when it's bad weather in the North Sea. It's never very much fun rolling around with a ship. Well, that's it about the Kiel Canal. I hope that I managed to illuminate the territory for you. I will add stuff when I get my hands on interesting info, so keep an eye out.

And the Kiel Canal is actually on my list of things to do before I'm getting too old. So there is yet another reason to keep your eyes out for that adventure on www.aladdin.st.

• To experience a hangover
• African safari
• To see Polar bears and icebergs
• Whale sharks “Failed”
• Tiger safari
• Whale sharks (second try)
• Koala and Kangaroo adventure in Australia
• Swimming with Humpback whales
• • Wildlife tour in Sweden/ Finland to see bears, moose, beavers, wolverines and wolf
• Antarctica
• The Amazon in Brazil
• Kiel - Brunsbüttel - Bicycling along the Kiel Canal


       
                  



                         

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