PLEASE! If you see any mistakes, I'm 100% sure that I have wrongly identified some birds.
So please let me know on my guestbook at the bottom of the page
Changeable Hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus

The Changeable Hawk-eagle or Crested Hawk-eagle (Nisaetus cirrhatus) is a bird of prey species of the family Accipitridae. It was formerly placed in the genus Spizaetus, but studies pointed to the group being paraphyletic resulting in the Old World members being placed in Nisaetus (Hodgson, 1836) and separated from the New World species.

Changeable Hawk-eagles breed in the Indian subcontinent, mainly in India and Sri Lanka, and from the southeast rim of the Himalaya across Southeast Asia to Indonesia and the Philippines. This is a bird occurring singly (outside mating season) in open woodland, although island forms prefer a higher tree density. It builds a stick nest in a tree and lays a single egg.

Bird of prey, raptor

A bird of prey, predatory bird, or raptor is any of several species of bird that hunts and feeds on rodents and other small animals. The term raptor is derived from the Latin word rapere, meaning to seize or take by force. Birds of prey have keen vision that allows them to detect their prey during flight, as well as powerful talons and beaks.

Taken literally, the term bird of prey has a wide meaning that includes many birds that hunt and feed on animals and also birds that eat very small insects. Ornithology has a narrower definition of bird of prey: a bird that has very good eyesight for finding food, strong feet for holding food, and a strong curved beak for tearing flesh. Most birds of prey also have strong curved talons for catching or killing prey.

An example of this difference in definition, the narrower definition excludes storks and gulls, which can eat quite large fish, partly because these birds catch and kill prey entirely with their beaks, and similarly bird-eating skuas, fish-eating penguins, and vertebrate-eating Kookaburras are excluded. Birds of prey generally prey on vertebrates, which are usually quite large relative to the size of the bird. Most also eat carrion, at least occasionally, and vultures and condors eat carrion as their main food source.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


Range map from www.oiseaux.net

Range map
Range map from www.oiseaux.net - Ornithological Portal Oiseaux.net
www.oiseaux.net is one of those MUST visit pages if you're in to bird watching. You can find just about everything there

Description
The Changeable Hawk-eagle is a medium-large raptor at about 60–72 centimetres in length with a 127–138 centimetres wingspan, and a weight ranging from 1.2 to 1.9 kg. It is a relatively slender forest eagle with some subspecies (especially N. c. limnaetus) being dimorphic giving the name "changeable". This and their complicated phylogeny further complicate precise identification.

Length: 60 - 72 cm
Wingspan: 127 – 138 cm
Weight: 1200 - 1900 g
Longevity:
Distinctive Feature

Similar Species



From opus at www.birdforum.net
Female / Male / Juvenile

• Sexes alike; females larger

The name is due to the dual morph phases - a dark morph and a pale morph.

From opus at www.birdforum.net


Normally brown above, they have white below with barring on the undersides of the flight feathers and tail; black longitudinal streaks occur on the throat and chocolate streaks occur on the breast. Some subspecies have a crest of four feathers, but this is all but absent in others. The sexes are quite similar in their plumage, but males are about 15% smaller than females. The underparts and head of juveniles are whitish or buff with few dark streaks.

The wings are long and parallel-sided, and are held flat in flight, which helps to distinguish this species from the similar mountain hawk-eagle. In overhead flight, comparatively rounded wings (upturned at tip), longish tail, white body (spotted with brown) and grey underside of wings (streaked and spotted) are leading pointers.

Their call is a loud, high-pitched ki-ki-ki-ki-ki-ki-ki-ki-kee, beginning short, rising in crescendo, and ending in a scream.

Changeable Hawk-eagle

Remarks from the Recordist

Dark morph perched in tree around parrot pre-roost area. gave this call frequently over a period of 30 minutes.

A strong wind was blowing so I have just cut out this small fragment (the calls did not vary)


Remarks from the Recordist

Long series of differing calls from a bird perched about 60 feet up above rainforest boardwalk. called for around 5 minutes continuously. recording identified by Lim Kim Chuah who believes it is probably a juvenile

www.xeno-canto.org

Dimorphic

The Changeble Hawk-eagle is Dimorphic which means that the same speicies could have two different colour on the plummage. Dark morph and light morph

I have searched the internet and the only thing I found was the www.sciencedaily.com and they suggest that it might depending on the light conditions in the habitate. They had studied the Black Sparrowhawks and they found that the dark birds did better in dark light conditions and light birds did better in brighter light conditions.

They found that the frequency of the different morphs varied according to the ambient light levels found during the breeding season.


I spotted the below bird at Tabin Wildlife Reserve, Borneo September 2017 and my Guide told me that it was I Changeble Hawk-eagle. I had never seen a Changeble Hawk-eagle in this colour before. I investigated and it could be a Changeble Hawk Eagle DARK MORPH. I checked the internet and I only found one site with information, www.malaysianbirds.com I qoute:

The unique point about this birds is that the bird is dimorphic, a bird that could developed as 2 different colored birds. The dark morph is chocolate-brown all over, tail base might appear lighter, then a light colored white morph. The bird has evolved through a complicated phylogeny that makes exact ID difficult. Both sexes are identical though the female may be marginally larger. We are having the crestless sub-species though a tiny "crest" is visible at times.

So I could put down the bird as a Changeble Hawk Eagle (Dark Morph)

Changeable Hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle (Dark Morph) - September 2017 - Tabin Wildlife Reserve, Borneo


Ecology
Changeable Hawk-eagles eat mammals, birds, and reptiles. They keep a sharp lookout perched bolt upright on a bough amongst the canopy foliage of some high tree standing near a forest clearing.

There, they wait for junglefowl, pheasants, hares, and other small animals coming out into the open. The bird then swoops down forcefully, strikes, and carries the prey away in its talons.

Changeable Hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle with a dead Red Spur Fowl
March 2018 - Tadoba Andhari Tiger Project, India

Changeable Hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle with a snake in the talons
March 2018 - Bardiya/ Bardia National Park, Nepal


Talons

noun a claw, especially one belonging to a bird of prey



Nesting
• Season: December to April
a large stick platform lined with green leaves, high up in a forest tree
• a single one, greyish white, unmarked or with faint specks and blotches of light reddish at the broad end

“A large stick platform lined with green leaves, high up in a forest tree” So I think I got an explanation to what the Changeable Hawk-eagle did in the tree next to me in Bardiya/ Bardia National Park, Nepal.


30 March 2018 - Bardiya/ Bardia National Park, Nepal

Changeable Hawk-eagle, शदलचील, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle sitting among the leafes

Changeable Hawk-eagle, शदलचील, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle sitting among the leafes

Changeable Hawk-eagle, शदलचील, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle sitting among the leafes


Listen to the Changeable Hawk-eagle screaming just next to us
Own recording with my ZOOM H5 Handy Recorder

Remarks from the Recordist

Driving along the dirt road in Bardiya/ Bardia National Park and suddenly we hear scream very close to us. We stop the jeep and there is a Changable Hawk Eagle sitting in the tree next to us. The bird was sitting on the very thin sprigs/ twigs among the leaves.

First I thought the bird was hurt. The Eagle was stumbling around in the leaves. Then it looked like the eagle was eating the leafs on the sprigs/ twigs. Maybe the bird was collecting leafs and small twigs to build a nest. But would it be possible to scream with the mouth full of leafs?

At 00:38 we can hear the Eagle taking off flying just above me landing in a tree on the other side of the road. One more call at 00:52 and the Eagle takes off again flying out over the open fields

www.xeno-canto.org


Systematics
The Flores hawk-eagle has traditionally been treated as a subspecies of the Changeable Hawk-eagle, but it is now often treated as a separate species, N. floris.

Two distinct groups exist in the Changeable Hawk-eagle; one with crests and one without or with hardly visible crests. Dark morphs exist for some populations.

Changeable hawk-eagle

• N. c. cirrhatus
Gangetic plain southwards throughout India
Crested, no dark morph

Changeable Hawk-eagle or Crested hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle/ Crested hawk-eagle - Crested
January 2016 - Gir National Park, India, India


• N. c. ceylanensis
Sri Lanka (possibly also Travancore)
Smaller than nominate, crest proportionally longer on average, apparently no dark morph

Changeable Hawk-eagle or Crested hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle/ Crested hawk-eagle
Sri Lanka: Crest proportionally longer on average
May 2017 - Yala National Park, Sri Lanka


Crestless Changeable Hawk-eagle

• N. c. limnaeetus
Nepal, northeast India, via Burma and Malay Peninsula along Wallace Line to Philippines
Much like nominate except crest, dimorphic, with the dark morph chocolate-brown all over, tail base might appear lighter in flight

Changeable Hawk-eagle or Crested hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle/ Crested hawk-eagle - Nepal: Crestless
March 2018 - Bardiya/ Bardia National Park, Nepal


• N. c. andamanensis
Andaman Islands
Similar to N. c. limnaeetus, apparently no dark morph

• N. c. vanheurni
Simeulue Island
Similar to N. c. limnaeetus, apparently no dark morph


Gamauf et al. (2005) analyzed mtDNA cytochrome b and control region sequence data of a considerable number of specimens of the Crested Hawk-eagle and some relatives. Despite the large sample, even the most conspicuous dichotomy - that between the crested and crestless groups - was not as well resolved as it might have been expected to be.

The three small-island taxa (N. c. andamanensis, N. c. vanheurni, and N. floris) also appear as monophyletic lineages. Their placement is even more unresolved, with N. floris being apparently a very ancient lineage. The other two seem quite certainly to derive from N. c. limnaeetus. The latter taxon has a confusing phylogeny. Different lineages exist that are apparently not stable in space and time, are best described as polytomy, from which the similar island taxa derive.

Obviously, N. c. limnaeetus does not represent a monophyletic lineage. Neither the biological nor the phylogenetic species concepts, nor phylogenetic systematics can be applied to satisfaction. The crested group apparently is close to becoming a distinct species. The island taxa derived from N. c. limnaeetus appear to have undergone founder effects, which has restricted their genetic diversity. In the continental population, genetic diversity is considerable, and the evolutionary pattern of the two studied genes did not agree, and neither did the origin of specimens show clear structures. N. c. limnaeetus thus is best considered a metapopulation.

Gamauf et al. (2005) therefore suggest the island taxa which are obviously at higher risk of extinction are, for conservation considered evolutionary significant units regardless of their systematic status. This case also demonstrates that a too-rigid interpretation of cladistics and the desire for monophyletic taxa, as well as universal application of single-species concept to all birds will undermine correct understanding of evolutionary relationships.

It would even not be inconceivable to find mainland lineages to group closely with the western island taxa, if little genetic drift had occurred in the initial population. nonetheless, the divergence of this species' lineages seems to have taken place too recently to award them species status, as compared to the level of genetic divergence at which clades are usually considered distinct species.

N. c. limnaeetus appears for all that can be said with reasonable certainty basal pool of lineages in the crestless group that, despite not being monophyletic, should be considered a valid taxon as long as gene flow is possible through its range. In addition, as ancient DNA from museum specimens was used extensively, the possibility of ghost lineages must be considered.

If it is assumed that all or most of the ancient lineages still exist today, considerable recombination must have taken place as the two genes' phylogenies do not agree much, indicating a healthy level of gene flow. Whether this still holds true today remains to be determined.

Conservation status
../Changeable Hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Least Concern (IUCN 3.1)
IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. IUCN. 2013: e.T22732090A50443847.



From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

www.birdforum.net


Sighted: (Date of first photo that I could use) 8th of January 2016
Location: Along route #6 in Gir National Park, India


Among others I have used Peter Ericsson's web page Birds of Thailand These galleries contain 668 species of the Birds of Thailand and have been of a great help to identify some of the birds as the birds in Thailand and India are, well, many of them are the same.

I have had most help from my friend, the bird pal I met at Suan Rot Fai. Sending pictures of birds I have not been able to identify to him via Line. 3 minutes later he and he have managed to identify most of the birds I have had problems with. THANKS! Visit his web page m☥lever for his beautiful pictures.

PLEASE! As I'm a first time birdwatcher bear in mind that some of the bird can be wrongly named. I have bought book and I confirm on the internet to get the right identity on the birds I take pictures off. But there can still be mistakes.

Changeable Hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 8 January 2016 - Gir National Park, India
Observe the Mongoose next to the Eagle - Dinner

Changeable Hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 8 January 2016 - Gir National Park, India
Juvenile Changeable Hawk-eagle

Changeable Hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 8 January 2016 - Gir National Park, India
Juvenile Changeable Hawk-eagle

Changeable Hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 8 January 2016 - Gir National Park, India
Juvenile Changeable Hawk-eagle

Changeable Hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 8 January 2016 - Gir National Park, India
Juvenile Changeable Hawk-eagle

Changeable Hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 8 January 2016 - Gir National Park, India
Juvenile Changeable Hawk-eagle

Changeable Hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 8 January 2016 - Gir National Park, India
Juvenile Changeable Hawk-eagle

Changeable Hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 8 January 2016 - Gir National Park, India
Juvenile Changeable Hawk-eagle

Changeable Hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 11 January 2016 - Jhirna Zone in Jim Corbett National Park, India

Changeable Hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 3 February 2016 - Pench National Park, India
The Eagle is very annoyed by the noisy crows in the branches above

Changeable Hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 3 February 2016 - Pench National Park, India

Changeable Hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 3 February 2016 - Pench National Park, India

Changeable Hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 3 February 2016 - Pench National Park, India

Changeable Hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 3 February 2016 - Pench National Park, India

Changeable Hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 3 February 2016 - Pench National Park, India

Changeable Hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
A Juvenile Changeable Hawk-eagle - 3 February 2016 - Pench National Park, India

Changeable Hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
A Juvenile Changeable Hawk-eagle - 3 February 2016 - Pench National Park, India

Changeable Hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
A Juvenile Changeable Hawk-eagle - 3 February 2016 - Pench National Park, India

Changeable Hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
A Juvenile Changeable Hawk-eagle - 3 February 2016 - Pench National Park, India

Changeable Hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
A Juvenile Changeable Hawk-eagle - 3 February 2016 - Pench National Park, India

Changeable Hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
A Juvenile Changeable Hawk-eagle - 3 February 2016 - Pench National Park, India

Changeable Hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
A Juvenile Changeable Hawk-eagle - 3 February 2016 - Pench National Park, India

Changeable Hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
A Juvenile Changeable Hawk-eagle - 3 February 2016 - Pench National Park, India

Changeable Hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
A Juvenile Changeable Hawk-eagle - 3 February 2016 - Pench National Park, India

Changeable Hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
A Juvenile Changeable Hawk-eagle - 3 February 2016 - Pench National Park, India

Changeable Hawk-eagle or Crested hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle or Crested hawk-eagle
17 May 2017 - Yala National Park, Block 3, Sri Lanka

Changeable Hawk-eagle or Crested hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle or Crested hawk-eagle
19 May 2017 - Udawalawa National Park, Sri Lanka

Changeable Hawk-eagle or Crested hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle or Crested hawk-eagle
20 May 2017 - Yala National Park, Block 1, Sri Lanka
Drinking water when we pass the water hole

Changeable Hawk-eagle or Crested hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle or Crested hawk-eagle
21 May 2017 - Yala National Park, Block 1, Sri Lanka

Changeable Hawk-eagle or Crested hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle or Crested hawk-eagle
21 May 2017 - Yala National Park, Block 1, Sri Lanka

Changeable Hawk-eagle or Crested hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle or Crested hawk-eagle
21 May 2017 - Yala National Park, Block 1, Sri Lanka

Changeable Hawk-eagle or Crested hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle or Crested hawk-eagle
21 May 2017 - Yala National Park, Block 1, Sri Lanka

The Changeable Hawk-eagle/ Crested hawk-eagle landed just next to us. The bird was screaming like in pain when landing so I suspect the eagle hurt the foot landing

Changeable Hawk-eagle or Crested hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle or Crested hawk-eagle
21 May 2017 - Yala National Park, Block 1, Sri Lanka

Changeable Hawk-eagle or Crested hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle or Crested hawk-eagle
21 May 2017 - Yala National Park, Block 1, Sri Lanka

Changeable Hawk-eagle or Crested hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle or Crested hawk-eagle
21 May 2017 - Yala National Park, Block 1, Sri Lanka

Changeable Hawk-eagle or Crested hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle or Crested hawk-eagle
21 May 2017 - Yala National Park, Block 1, Sri Lanka

Changeable Hawk-eagle or Crested hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle or Crested hawk-eagle
21 May 2017 - Yala National Park, Block 1, Sri Lanka



Changeable Hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 15 March 2018 - Tadoba Andhari Tiger Project, India
Sitting on it's prey, a Red Spur Fowl

Changeable Hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 15 March 2018 - Tadoba Andhari Tiger Project, India
Sitting on it's prey, a Red Spur Fowl

Changeable Hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 15 March 2018 - Tadoba Andhari Tiger Project, India
Sitting on it's prey, a Red Spur Fowl

Changeable Hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 15 March 2018 - Tadoba Andhari Tiger Project, India
Sitting on it's prey, a Red Spur Fowl

Changeable Hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 15 March 2018 - Tadoba Andhari Tiger Project, India
Sitting on it's prey, a Red Spur Fowl

Changeable Hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 15 March 2018 - Tadoba Andhari Tiger Project, India
Sitting on it's prey, a Red Spur Fowl

Changeable Hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 15 March 2018 - Tadoba Andhari Tiger Project, India
Sitting on it's prey, a Red Spur Fowl

Changeable Hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 15 March 2018 - Tadoba Andhari Tiger Project, India
They Changeable Hawk-eagle takes off with it's prey

Changeable Hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 15 March 2018 - Tadoba Andhari Tiger Project, India

Changeable Hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 15 March 2018 - Tadoba Andhari Tiger Project, India

Changeable Hawk-eagle, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 15 March 2018 - Tadoba Andhari Tiger Project, India

Changeable Hawk-eagle, शदलचील, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle
We come around the corner and the eagle is sitting on it's prey

Changeable Hawk-eagle, शदलचील, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle
The eagle takes off and now we see that the prey is a snake

Changeable Hawk-eagle, शदलचील, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 27 March 2018 - Bardiya/ Bardia National Park, Nepal

Changeable Hawk-eagle, शदलचील, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 27 March 2018 - Bardiya/ Bardia National Park, Nepal
Our new friend lands in a tree

Changeable Hawk-eagle, शदलचील, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 27 March 2018 - Bardiya/ Bardia National Park, Nepal
Our new friend start to skin the snake

Changeable Hawk-eagle, शदलचील, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 27 March 2018 - Bardiya/ Bardia National Park, Nepal
I didn't knew that they were skinning the snakes before eating

Changeable Hawk-eagle, शदलचील, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 27 March 2018 - Bardiya/ Bardia National Park, Nepal

Changeable Hawk-eagle, शदलचील, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 27 March 2018 - Bardiya/ Bardia National Park, Nepal

Changeable Hawk-eagle, शदलचील, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 27 March 2018 - Bardiya/ Bardia National Park, Nepal

Changeable Hawk-eagle, शदलचील, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 27 March 2018 - Bardiya/ Bardia National Park, Nepal

Changeable Hawk-eagle, शदलचील, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 27 March 2018 - Bardiya/ Bardia National Park, Nepal

Changeable Hawk-eagle, शदलचील, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 27 March 2018 - Bardiya/ Bardia National Park, Nepal

Changeable Hawk-eagle, शदलचील, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 27 March 2018 - Bardiya/ Bardia National Park, Nepal
The eagle is not chewing the food

Changeable Hawk-eagle, शदलचील, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 27 March 2018 - Bardiya/ Bardia National Park, Nepal
The eagle is not chewing the food

Changeable Hawk-eagle, शदलचील, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 27 March 2018 - Bardiya/ Bardia National Park, Nepal
Little remains to swallow

Changeable Hawk-eagle, शदलचील, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 27 March 2018 - Bardiya/ Bardia National Park, Nepal
Now we can start with the head

Changeable Hawk-eagle, शदलचील, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 27 March 2018 - Bardiya/ Bardia National Park, Nepal

Changeable Hawk-eagle, शदलचील, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 27 March 2018 - Bardiya/ Bardia National Park, Nepal

Changeable Hawk-eagle, शदलचील, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 27 March 2018 - Bardiya/ Bardia National Park, Nepal

Changeable Hawk-eagle, शदलचील, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 27 March 2018 - Bardiya/ Bardia National Park, Nepal

Changeable Hawk-eagle, शदलचील, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 27 March 2018 - Bardiya/ Bardia National Park, Nepal

Changeable Hawk-eagle, शदलचील, Nisaetus cirrhatus
Changeable Hawk-eagle - 27 March 2018 - Bardiya/ Bardia National Park, Nepal


What an fantastic experience it was to get to see this!
A day in the forest and you never know what will happen





PLEASE! If I have made any mistakes identifying any bird, PLEASE let me know on my guestbook



       
                  



                                       

You are visitor no.
To www.aladdin.st since December 2005

Visitors from different countries since 26th of September 2011