Welcome onboard

This will take you on a guided tour on a tanker


Don't get sea sick Yet another Smiley on www.aladdin.st


Oil Tanker
A typical tanker of today. Hmm, I have seen the Panamagreek tankers and, hmm, well they don't look so nice
Well, this one don't look so nice either. I hope you can excuse my lack of artistic quality.


Today there are between 10 and 12 crew member on a small Product tanker. Yet another Smiley on www.aladdin.st Captain and 3 Deck officers. At least 3 AB's and 1 Cook. There are 1 Chief Engineer and at least 1 more engineer. Then there are an oiler. Some ships I had been on we had been 30 - 40 crew members on board. Radio Officer, Mess man, Deckhand, Wipers, Fitters and pump man and all kind of people. But if we keep us to a modern Swedish tanker there are about 10-12 man on board.

The first thing you do when you come on board (after making good friend with the Chief Officer, bring a gift) is to find out what to do and where to go in case of an alarm on board.

Muster List

There are muster lists on all deck. On the muster list you can see what each of the crew should do in case of fire or abandon the ship. You can also see where to muster. In many cases the muster station is on the bridge or at a fire station.

There are different alarms for fire or general alarm. Each of the crew have a task at the different situations. We have fire drills on board. Every 3 months the lifeboats should be launched and manoeuvred in the sea. The life boats should be lowered to the rail/ embarkation deck.
1) Remove lashings
2) Lower the boat to the deck
3) All crew boarding the life boat
4) Lower to boat in to the water
5) If the boat cannot be lowered form the boat the last man have to climb down to the boat
6) Release the lifeboat and leave the sinking/ burning ship

Lifeboat Drill

Freefall lifeboat
Freefall lifeboat - m/t Fure Sun 2002

Freefall lifeboat
Freefall lifeboat - m/t Fure Sun 2002

Freefall lifeboat
Freefall lifeboat - m/t Ek-River 2010

Freefall lifeboat
Crew in the freefall preparing for launch - m/t Tärnvik 2002

Freefall lifeboat
Launching the Freefall lifeboat - m/t Tärnvik 2002

Freefall lifeboat
Freefall lifeboat - m/t Bro Provider 2008

Almost all the new ship have a lifeboat of the " Free fall type ". Then it's just for the crew to enter the lifeboat and sit down. Fasten the seat belt and then release the lifeboat.

The crew is covered in the life boat from the weather and heat. When launching the boat it dives down in the water and it surfaces away from the ship. If the lifeboat engine is running at launch we can get away quick from the ship. There can be burning oil on the water so it's important to be able to get far away very quick.

There are sprinklers on the lifeboat as well and compressed air bottles in the lifeboat. So when the lifeboat passes through burning water we have air in the boat for the crew and engine and we can spray water on the outside to cool down the boat.

The covered free fall lifeboat is much better than the old lifeboats hanging from the side. Impossible to launch when the ship is rolling and there is no cover for the weather or heat.

If you have to leave a ship in one of those in the middle of the winter I think you would freeze to death before soon.

On the ship we have inflatable life rafts as well. Just throw the container in the sea and pull the lanyard and the rafts inflate. It's very important to make fast the release lanyard on board before you throw the raft in the sea. If you forget that the life raft just drifts away and there is no chance for you to get it back. You also need the lanyard for inflating the life raft.

A hard pull on the lanyard opens the valves to the compressed air bottles to inflate the raft.


Inflatable life raft
We have inflatable life rafts on both sides of the superstructure

Inflatable life raft
These rafts can be launched with the crane

We have life rafts on both sides of the superstructure. And a very long time ago there was a big bulk carrier that broke in to two pieces. After that we must have a small life raft forward on the fo'c's'le. We must have life rafts that we can launch with a crane/ davit. We usually have these life rafts at the MOB boat so we can use the MOB boat davit.

1) Connect the life raft
2) Swing out the life raft outside the ship side
3) Inflate the life raft (Now we understand why we must swing out the raft)
4) Swing back the raft to the ship side
5) Board the life raft
6) Launch the life raft with the remote wire hanging from the crane

Inflatable life raft
Training with expired inflatable life rafts on board m/t Barcarolle 2007
We see that this is a small life raft. For 6 persons only to be stored forward

Inflatable life raft
Training with expired inflatable life rafts on board m/t Barcarolle 2007
We see that this is a small life raft. For 6 persons only to be stored forward

Inflatable life raft
Training in Kalmar, Sweden May 2014

Back in the days there was a big ferry. I think the name was Prinsessan Margareta. When she was on her way to Copenhagen from Oslo she ran up on Kullaberg, right at Kullens light house. A passing ship called her on the VHF radio and asked:
- Don't you think it would be better if you swap the lifeboats for bicycles?

  THIS KIND OF BEHAVIOR IS NOT ENCOURAGED ON WWW.ALADDIN.ST.  
At www.aladdin.st we dissociate ourselves from this kind of behaviour.


Fire fighting department 
In the case of fire you call the fire department, easy enough as long as you are ashore. On a ship we have to fight the fire ourselves. Every 5 years we're on a fire fighting course, otherwise we're not allowed to renew our licences. If you want to see pictures from my last firefighting course just CLICK.

Fire station on board m/t Tärnvåg 2009
Fire station on board m/t Tärnvåg 2009
On the ship we have different fire stations on board. They are equipped with stuff to use during firefighting. Surprise?

In the fire stations we have fireman's outfit with breathing apparatus. These BA sets are used for smoke diving. There are also fire hoses, axes and other stuff in the fire stations.

Dry Powder Fire Extinguisher
Dry Powder Fire Extinguisher
CO2 Fire Extinguisher
CO2 Fire Extinguisher

CO2 Fire Extinguisher
Wheeled foam Extinguisher

CO2 Fire Extinguisher
Wheeled foam Extinguisher

We have different kinds of portable fire extinguishers on board. They are places around the ships and on the bridge and other places with electric equipment we have CO2 extinguishers. We have dry powder in the accommodation for fires in normal material. There is also water extinguishers and foam extinguishers as well. We have the bigger “wheeled” extinguishers on board as well. In areas where a portable extinguisher won't be enough they place the “wheeled” units.

On deck we have foam monitors so we can cover the deck with foam in case of fire. There are also hydrants and fire hoses around the ship ready for immediate use. There should be a fire hydrant close to all the fire hose boxes on deck. So if you see a fire hose box you know that there is a fire hydrant as well. Should not be necessary to go look for the hydrant when you have the hose. Everything for a quick response to any fire on board.

CO2 Fire Extinguisher
Fire hose box with fire hose and nozzle

CO2 Fire Extinguisher
Fire hydrant and a Fire hose box

On tankers we need to have foam monitors on deck so we can cover the deck with foam in case of fire. Any leak on deck and a spark is enough for a disaster. But with the foam monitors we can cover deck with foam in a jiff.

We have a big tank with foam liquid. The fire pump running and we start the pump at the foam tank. The foam liquid is pumped in to the foam line where it mix with the water and we have foam coming out from the foam monitors

On the drawing below we have a foam set up. Should be easy to understand how it works. Also easy to understand that it is only water coming out from the foam monitors if we don't start the foam pump. Can come in handy when cleaning deck or removing ice from deck.

Foam monitor
Foam monitor
Foam monitor on deck

Foam monitor
m/t Randgrid 2011 and we have remote controlled foam monitors

Foam monitor
Our Cadet running the foam monitors with the remote control - m/t Randgrid 2011

Foam monitor
Operating the foam monitor (Water only) - m/t Bro Provider 2008

Foam monitor
Only water coming - m/t Bro Provider 2008

Foam monitor
Now the foam is coming - m/t Bro Provider 2008

Foam monitor
m/t Bro Provider 2008

Foam monitor
m/t Bro Provider 2008

Foam monitor
m/t Bro Provider 2008

Foam monitor
m/t Bro Provider 2008

Foam monitor
m/t Bro Provider 2008


Dramatic pictures, but don't be afraid. Maybe you can handle the excitements in the merchant marine. Maybe try one of the companies listed on my MARINE JOBS page. Click HERE!

During the drills we have to test the equipment and the equipment is checked so it's always ready for use. After seeing the pictures from my firefighting course you realize how important those courses are. It don't take much fuel to make a big fire. So the firefighting courses are really important as we train as we cannot do on board the ships. We do real smoke diving and we learn how to put out fires (just throw water on the fire). We also learn how to maintain the equipment on these courses.

Of course, we have drills on board, every month we have a fire drill. And even though we don't have big fires on board the drills are very important. Get familiar with the equipment etc. even if it will never be the same as being trained with real fire by professionals.

Fire drill on board m/t Bro Jupiter Fire drill on board m/t Bro Jupiter








Fire at the bunker manifold - Fire drill on board m/t Bro Jupiter August 2006

Fire drill on board m/t Bro Jupiter
Fire fighters going to the bunker manifold

Fire drill on board m/t Bro Jupiter
Protected behind the water shield when approaching the fire

Fire drill on board m/t Bro Jupiter
Approaching the bunker manifold

Fire drill on board m/t Bro Jupiter
Start closing the bunker valve- Note the foam monitor spraying water in the upper left corner

Fire drill on board m/t Bro Jupiter
Manifold closed and fire extinguished




Fire drill on board m/t Tärnvåg Fire drill on board m/t Tärnvåg








Fire in the accommodation - Fire drill on board m/t Tärnvåg 2009

Fire drill on board m/t Tärnvåg
Smoke divers enter the accommodation to fight fire and to look for missing person

Fire drill on board m/t Tärnvåg
Missing person is save on deck

Fire drill on board m/t Tärnvåg
Injured crew member are ready to be hoisted to a helicopter for evacuation



In the engine room CO2 are the most common way to extinguish fires with since they forbid the use of Halon. CO2 take away the oxygen from the engine room. There can't be any fire without oxygen. It's also impossible for any living thing to survive CO2 so the engine room must be evacuated before they release the CO2 in to the engine room.

It very important to go to the MUSTER STATION immediately at an alarm so we can count the crew and see if any crew is missing. And the first thing you do when joining a ship is to study the muster list and locate the muster station. Anyway now this tends to get a little boring, so let's continue with something more exciting.

The crew

We are 3 Deck Officers working 4 hours and then we are 8 hours off. As we say on the ship: we are on watch (duty). So there are always someone on watch on the ship. All Officers stand watches at sea. In port they are on watches as well during loading and discharging.
- Chief Officer is responsible for the maintenance of the equipment on deck. He's responsible for cargo handling and equipment. He have to put the AB's to work.
- 2nd Officer (Navigation officer) is responsible for the navigation equipment. He corrects the charts and keep everything up to date.
- 3rd Officer (Safety Officer) is responsible for the LSA (Lifesaving appliance). He check the lifeboats, rafts, lifebuoys and everything concerning the safety equipment.
- Chief Engineer is the head of the fire brigade. So he's in charge of the firefighting equipment. Chief engineer is also in charge in the engine room.

Bridge watch
2nd Officer and AB on the bridge watch - m/t Tärnvik January 2002

Bridge watch
Bridge watch on board Rainbow Warrior

For example if the Chief Officer stands the 8 - 12 watch there is a 2nd Officer relieving him at 12 o'clock. Then at 4 o'clock 3rd Officer comes on watch until 8 o'clock when I get on my watch. On each watch the Officer have an AB. During the night the AB are on the bridge (complaining about the music) helping the duty Officer to keep a look out for other ships.

Day time the AB works on deck, there is always painting, chipping and greasing to do. Maintenance. During loading and discharging the AB is on deck watching for leaks and he tend to the mooring ropes. During discharging the AB is stripping the tanks from deck while duty Officer controls the cargo pump from the CCR. What the AB's doing during the stripping varies with pump type. But mainly it's to open valves for the compressed air and check down the tank to see that it's empty.

On tankers loading crude and other heavy oil the AB is dipping the tank while we strip. He sends down a weight fixed to a rope in the tank. Then he take up the weight and he can see the level in the tank.
- OK, dip the tank, I tell the AB on the radio.
- It's 2 cm. He reply.

If it's liquid we can try to strip a little more. But if it's residues it's not pumpable and we have ROB (rest on board). With these cargoes we usually have a ROB of 10-30m³ when we are finished with the discharging.

Sometimes you can caught sight of Captain lolling around. Most of the time he's busy watching a video or drinking coffee.

Mooring and anchoring equipment

Well, let's take the opportunity to learn a little about anchors, anchoring and moorings when we are out here on deck looking. There is plenty equipment for anchor and mooring handling.

On the fo’c’s’le, that's forward of the ship, there is mooring winches that we use when we secure the ship to the jetty. We send ashore mooring ropes and the boatmen put the ropes on bollard ashore. Then we keep our ropes tight while we are alongside.

On the poop, that’s the aft part of the ship, there is also mooring winches. Depending on the size of the ship and the weather we use 4 - 6 ropes forward and aft. On the big VLCC's we used 10 - 12 mooring ropes. So we have to wake up extra crew from the other watches at arrival and departure to help out with the mooring. Today most of the ship have mooring winches so it is easy to tie up the ship. At departure it is just to spin up the ropes on the winches.

Back in the day there was only a capstan on the poop deck and two capstans forward. Loose ropes we sent ashore, heaving the ropes with the capstan and then we had to use a stopper removing the ropes from the capstan to put them on the bollards. ONE BY ONE.

Forecastle with mooring/ anchor winches - m/t Fure Sun 2002

Poop deck m/t Aurum
Poop deck m/t Aurum 1987

Poop deck m/t Bro Jupiter
Mooring winches on board m/t Bro Jupiter 2006

Poop deck m/t Bellona
The capstan in the middle on the poop deck - m/t Bellona 1990

Poop deck m/t Bellona
Using the capstan to heave up the mooring rope - m/t Bellona 1990

Poop deck m/t Bellona
On this deck we can see how the rope is made fast on the bollard - m/t Bellona 1990

Poop deck m/t Vestria
The capstan was also good to use as table when BBQ on the poop deck - m/t Vestria 1984

Well, while at it, lets have a look at our moorings as well. Maybe, I say maybe, we can learn a thing or two about mooring a ship.

At arrival to a port there are boatmen waiting on the jetty. Boatmen are the guys taking ashore our mooring lines. We are using a line with a weight at the end (Heaving line) to get ashore our mooring lines. We make fast the heaving line in our mooring line and throw it ashore. The boatmen take the heaving line and pull it ashore with our mooring line. We must use a heaving line because the mooring line is very heavy and it's not possible to throw it. And sometimes the boatmen come out with small boats to pick up the mooring lines. Then it's just to drop down the mooring lines in the mooring boat.

Below you can see how the mooring looks and my beautiful and pedagogical drawing on how the winches are placed on the ship. Of course there are many variations, but this is the basic.

A typical mooring arrangement, on big ships we use at least double mooring lines.

Most of the jetties have fenders so there are some space between the jetty and the ship side. Same when we are moored next to a ship. Then they provide floating fenders that are made fast on one of the ships.

Bollard
Here we can see how they use a bollard ashore for the mooring ropes


Fenders
Here we can see a fender on the jetty

Fenders
Here we can see the fender on the jetty

STS fenders
Delivering fenders before STS operation

STS fenders
Delivering fenders before STS operation

STS fenders
The fenders are in position

STS fenders
The ship can come alongside our ship side

Of course, it is easy to understand that we need to prepare our mooring lines before arrival. The crew pull out “slack” on deck. Then we can slack out very quickly and when the rope is on the bollard ashore we adjust the length with the mooring winch.

m/t Ternvik
Preparing the fo'c's'le for arrival - m/t Ternvik 2011

m/t Ternvik
Preparing the fo'c's'le for arrival - m/t Ternvik 2011

m/t Ternvik
The ropes on the fo'c's'le is ready to send ashore - m/t Ternvik 2011

Bosun preparing a heaving line - m/t Astoria 2005

On the jetty there is bollards so the boatmen can make fast the mooring lines. On most of the oil terminals the jetty is not long enough to use for mooring. We can use the jetty for our spring lines but for head and stern lines there are Dolphins, it's like small islands with a bollard on top of them.

m/t Framnäs
2nd Officer operating the mooring winches forward - m/t Framnäs 2003

m/t Ternvag
Here is an example on how the jetty isn't long enough - Forward spring on bollard - m/t Ternvag 2015

m/t Ek-River
Coming alongside, we see the forward spring lines - m/t Ek-River 2009

m/t Ek-River
Here we use 3 head lines - m/t Ek-River 2009

m/t Ternvik
Here we can see all the mooring lines from the poop deck - m/t Ternvik 2011
Breast line + Aft spring and the stern lines

m/t Tärnvind
Here we see the head lines and spring lines forward - m/t Tärnvind 2002

m/t Ek-Star
Headlines from 2 ships in Go:teborg - m/t Ek-Star 2010

When it's time to leave the jetty we slack on our mooring lines and the boatmen can let go the lines. We only have to winch them back on board again and we're off for new exciting destinations.

Pretty straight forward on board m/t Prospero 2004

On the forecastle we have our anchor winches as well. We are dropping our anchor while waiting for our jetty and shore readiness etc.

When we are waiting at the anchorage we have to be on anchor watch on the bridge. Keep a look out so we hold our position. It have happen that the ship is dragging the anchor in bad weather. Then we have to start up the engine and move so we don't hit other ship or end up on land.

A ship have 2 anchors forward and sometimes there is 1 anchor on the poop deck aft. I'm going to TRY to tell you all a little something about the anchor. I will try to illuminate the territory for you, so Old stock anchorhang on! Hmm, I hope I can do better than my drawing of an anchor at your left hand side.

The anchor is attached to a ship or boat by a cable or chain and lowered to the bottom to hold the vessel in position by means of a fluke that digs into the sea bottom.

Way back they used large stones, basket and sacks filled with stones and sand and all sorts of things, use your imagination, these held the vessel merely by their weight and by friction along the bottom.

Those anchors worked fine with small boats but as ships became larger, they required a more effective device to hold them. They came up with hooks that dug into the sea bottom and when they made iron anchors they could put flukes on the anchor to help the hooks dig into the bottom.

Another major improvement was when they put a stock, see my nice drawing, on the anchor. The stock is in a right angel to the arms. Hmm, my drawing skills lefts more than a little to wish for, but Stockless anchor on MT Prosperolooking at the anchor from above it should look like an X. The stock makes the anchor to lay vertically on the bottom, and thus one fluke will dig itself in, providing maximum holding power.

Stock anchors were used for a long time but 1821 the stockless anchor was patented in England. This anchor was easy to handle and to stow, as you can see on the picture on the left the anchor is flat.

The flukes are long and heavy and as more force is applied on the chain, Stockless anchorthe shoulders force the flukes down into the bottom.

Stockless anchors are now the most common anchor on large ships today. But there are other kind of anchors in use, e.g. the mushroom anchor. Well, you don't win a trip to Bahamas if you Stud link chainfigure out that the anchor is shaped like an mushroom. Well, it's an upside-down mushroom, but still shaped like a mushroom. Anchors are used as a permanent mooring for lightships etc.

Yeah, let's have some fun. And what's more fun than taking a quick peek on how an anchor chain looks like. Well, we use a chain called stud-link chain on ships. On a stud-link chain every links has a stud across its inside width. These studs add weight, keep the chain from fouling or kinking, and help prevent deformation.

On the right hand picture you can see the anchor chain coming from the winch and disappears down through the deck and the end is made fast in the anchor. AB is standing behind the chain. That's about it in the matter of the anchor and the anchor chain.


Now let’s see how we are using the anchor. I made a video and now it's time to see if the video works. My lack of talent make me doubtful, but let’s see if we can get the video going.

Yo! Have this video making made me going or what? I managed to make another junky video


We lower the anchor to the seabed and we must keep track on how much anchor chain we have dropped. The chain is marked in shackles, usually it's by paint or a hose clamp. I learned a good knack from an old AB. Tie a piece of rope or lanyard, about 40-50cm in length on each shackle.

Then it's easy to see when the shackle comes up from the chain box. Mostly the paint on the shackles is gone and when dropping the anchor the chain pass very quick, so it's hard to see the small hose clamps. You can see a shackle marked with a hose clamp on the video.

A shackle is 27 meters long. Mostly we drop 5 - 6 shackles and that is about 160 meter of chain. It's better to have a little extra chain if the weather turns bad.

A stockless anchor. Here you can see the anchor at the bottom of a dry dock
Chain mark, shackle is red and 1 white link on each side means 1 shackle (27m)
Chain mark, shackle is red and 2 white link on each side means 2 shackles (54m)
Pictures taken 20th of June 2004 when Bro Jupiter was in dry dock.


m/t Argo Pallas
Anchor winch on a super tanker - m/t Argo Pallas 1996

m/t Barcarolle
Dropping the anchor - A lot of dust from the chain - m/t Barcarolle 2008

m/t Barcarolle
Dropping the anchor - A lot of dust from the chain - m/t Barcarolle 2008

We got some information and accident reports sent to us on board the ships. Lessons to learn and we might avoid accidents. Some of the latest information I received in January 2018. Click on the links below for some interesting reading:

MOST ANCHOR LOSSES ARE AVOIDABLE from DNV GL, Gard and The Swedish Club

Anchor Windlass Design and Testing

ATSB Incident report into the grounding of the M/V Pasha Bulker

Investigation of the catastrophic failure of a windlass hydraulic motor on board Stellar Voyager

DNV GL, Gard and The Swedish Club

There is an excellent video from DNV GL, Gard and The Swedish Club to be found on www.dnvgl.com: Anchor loss prevention - Technical and operational challenges and recommendations.

A rising number of anchor losses reported over the last several years prompted DNV GL, Gard and The Swedish Club to investigate this issue. Based on an analysis of damage cases involving anchor and anchor chain losses, the project partners have issued a presentation identifying the most frequent technical and operational causes, and some steps crews and operators can take to address them.

Watch the video
The following anchor awareness video looks at the essential aspects of anchoring and the technical issues related to anchor loss identified in the presentation.


Well, I think that's about it concerning mooring and anchoring.


So if they need they call us 2 hours before watch and 2 hours after watch. Sometimes all crew is required for mooring. After departure we have to make the ship ready, Ship shape. Store and secure all ropes etc. on deck. If it's bad weather we need to secure everything on board. Our ropes are on winches, but some port require extra mooring ropes and then we have to bring out loose ropes. Then it is “old school” mooring. Using the capstans and stoppers to put the ropes on the bollards.

Of course, this is some extra work to secure these ropes at departure. As you understand we cannot have anything lying around on deck in bad weather. In the winter it's always bad weather in Europe. Then it's better to stay home.

m/t Fure Sun - Poop deck
Securing the loose ropes on the poop deck at departure - Fure Sun 2002

m/t Fure Sun - Poop deck
Securing the loose ropes on the poop deck at departure - Fure Sun 2002

m/t Fure Sun - Fo'c's'le
Securing fire wires on the fo'c's'le deck at departure - Fure Sun 2002

m/t Fure Sun - Fo'c's'le
Securing the anchor after departure - Fure Sun 2002

m/t Fure Sun - Fo'c's'le
Securing the anchor after departure - Fure Sun 2002

Well, I was just about to say that “you get used to it”, but you never get used to bad weather.

Accommodation

Yeah-yeah, hang on! This will not be less boring than watching the anchor plunge down the water. Now let's have a look on how the sailors live on the ship. Well, hardly time for anything else than work on board. But we need some place to sleep. On the top is the wheel house or bridge. Below the bridge is the cabins and in the bottom we have the kitchen and the mess room. There are a day rom (TV room and a smoke room. We have gymnasium and laundry room etc. on board as well.

We eat in the mess room and this is the only time you have a chance to meet all the crew at the same time. Otherwise it's just sleeping and working, never any time for something fun. So the meals are important. The dayroom is a dangerous place if you got stuck in front of the TV with a big plate of lasagne. But today there is TV in most of the cabins so the day room is almost empty all the time.

No one see you eating the lasagne and I'm not sure that is a bad thing. Sometimes it's nice to eat you lasagne alone, as much as you want and you can watch what you want.

Superstructure - m/t Ternvag
The Superstructure

We have our own cabin with shower. Back in the days they could live many people in 1 cabin. OK, there are still shit ships with no food and salary and I doubt that they have showers in their cabins.

Cabin - m/t Prospero
Cabin - Day room on board m/t Prospero 2004

Cabin - m/t Prospero
Cabin - Day room on board m/t Prospero 2004

Cabin - m/t Prospero
Cabin - Bed room on board m/t Prospero 2004

Cabin - m/t Prospero
Another one of the cabins I have lived in - Dayroom

Cabin - m/t Prospero
Another one of the cabins I have lived in - Dayroom

Cabin - m/t Prospero
Another one of the cabins I have lived in - Bedroom

Cabin - m/t Prospero
Another one of the cabins I have lived in - Bedroom

Dayroom - m/t Randgrid
Smoke room - m/t Randgrid 2011

Dayroom - m/t Randgrid
Smoke room - m/t Randgrid 2011

Dayroom - m/t Randgrid
Playing bingo in the dayroom - m/t Randgrid 2011

Dayroom - Rainbow Warrior
Playing card in the combined mess and day room on board Rainbow Warrior

Dayroom - Bellatrix
Very small day/ mess room on board Bellatrix

There is a kitchen and a Cook making food 3 times a day. On the ships I have been to, but still, many ships don't have food. And the crew never receive their salaries. How can serious companies compete with these companies?

Our Cook - m/t Randgrid
Our Cook - m/t Randgrid 2011

Mess room - m/t Randgrid
Eating dinner in the mess room - m/t Randgrid 2011

Mess room - m/t Randgrid
Dinner in the mess room - m/t Randgrid 2011

Mess room - m/t Randgrid
Kitchen crew - m/t Randgrid 2011

Mess room - m/t Randgrid
Kitchen - m/t Randgrid 2011

Mess room - m/t Pegasus
Mess room - Pegasus 2005

Mess room - m/t Tärnsund
Mess room - m/t Tärnsund

Making Fläskpankaka - m/t Astoria 2004

We get new video films every month. There are books on board. They change the books when you call the Swedish Seaman's Church. You can find the Swedish church in the big ports like Rotterdam, Antwerp, London and Liverpool etc. I used to call the Swedish Seaman's Church in Singapore when we passed there. So the Agent or Ship chandler brought the Swedish newspaper to the ship. Very good service.

On the ship it's possible to send and receive e-mail. Well, today we have internet on the ships. Well, not on Alpha Ship, but on all other ships I have been working on.

In my cabin I have my own bathroom with shower. There is a sleeping cabin and a day room. In the dayroom I have a sofa and armchairs so I can sit and work with my computer in a relaxed atmosphere. I have TV and video, but I never have time to watch any TV. Well, maybe I have the TV news going while writing on my web page. But I'm asleep most of the time in my cabin.

Laundry room

Mess room - m/t Barcarolle
Gymnasium - m/t Randgrid 2011

Mess room - m/t Randgrid
Gymnasium - m/t Barcarolle 2007

Mess room - m/t Bro Jupiter
Gymnasium - m/t Bro Jupiter 2006

Washing machines is a must. At least 2, 1 for working cloths and 1 for other cloths so there is a laundry room on board so we can wash our cloths. There is also a gymnasium, in the gymnasium there usually are a ping pong table and weights. A bicycle and stuff for exercise. (I have no time to spend there) Today there is just as much people on the ship as they need so it's work and sleep.

Even if you haven't become a salty sailor at least now you know a little about the ship and the crew. Yes yes I know you are jumping up and down in excitement to see the bridge.

Now it's time, so make sure you have your hands in your pocket and don't touch any buttons or pull any levers. Let's go to the bridge, remember, hands in the pocket and click HERE

       
                  


                         

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