The International Ship and Port Facility Security Code


The text is copied from IMO's ISPS code.
After reading half of it I was a sleep.

The International Ship and Port Facility Security Code (ISPS Code) was adopted by IMO at the Conference of Contracting Governments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS), 1974: 9 - 13 December 2002.

The objectives of this Code are:

.1 to establish an international framework involving co-operation between Contracting Governments, Government agencies, local administrations and the shipping and port industries to detect security threats and take preventive measures against security incidents affecting ships or port facilities used in international trade;
.2 to establish the respective roles and responsibilities of the Contracting Governments, Government agencies, local administrations and the shipping and port industries, at the national and international level for ensuring maritime security;
.3 to ensure the early and efficient collection and exchange of security-related information;
.4 to provide a methodology for security assessments so as to have in place plans and procedures to react to changing security levels; and
.5 to ensure confidence that adequate and proportionate maritime security measures are in place.
Hmm, as I told you, the text drives me up the wall. But it in SHORT it means that all parties should help prevent act of terror. (My interpretation)

In order to achieve its objectives, this Code embodies a number of functional requirements. These include, but are not limited to:
.1 gathering and assessing information with respect to security threats and exchanging such information with appropriate Contracting Governments;
.2 requiring the maintenance of communication protocols for ships and port facilities;
.3 preventing unauthorized access to ships, port facilities and their restricted areas;
.4 preventing the introduction of unauthorized weapons, incendiary devices or explosives to ships or port facilities;
.5 providing means for raising the alarm in reaction to security threats or security incidents;
.6 requiring ship and port facility security plans based upon security assessments; and
.7 requiring training, drills and exercises to ensure familiarity with security plans and procedures.
This is how they are going to prevent an act of terror. Pretty basic, but on the ship I have been working on we have prevented the unauthorized weapons, incendiary devices and explosives to come onboard.
We should have drills and exercises to ensure familiarity with security plans and procedures.

• Ship security plan means a plan developed to ensure the application of measures on board the ship designed to protect persons on board, cargo, cargo transport units, ship?s stores or the ship from the risks of a security incident.

• Port facility security plan means a plan developed to ensure the application of measures designed to protect the port facility and ships, persons, cargo, cargo transport units and ships stores within the port facility from the risks of a security incident.
I don't know about the port but onboard we have always held fire and lifeboat drills etc. in order to protect persons on board, cargo, cargo transport units, ship?s stores or the ship from the risks of a security incident. I don't know any plan that can
protect the ship from an assault. Hey! even today 2004 the problem with pirates increases every year. The pirates come onboard with speedboats and are armed to their tooth's with machine guns and
stuff. If a guy comes onboard with a machine gun there isn't very much to do. Yeah-yeah, you say that we should keep sharp lookout for pirates to prevent them from coming.

In Malacca Strait and outside West Africa with millions of small fishing boats and rafts there isn't very much to do.
The only way to prevent the piracy is to go in 2nd World War style convoys.

What if we are shot at from shore? All the oil and gods from Europe, Africa and Persian Gulf to Japan, Taiwan and China have to pass Malacca Strait.
When we passed Singapore we hade just a few meters under keel when fully loaded. It's very narrow and if a terrorist could sink us outside Singapore the wreck would stop all the traffic, catastrophe!

Shipping companies will be required to designate a Company Security Officer for the Company and a Ship Security Officer for each of its ships. The Company Security Officer's responsibilities include ensuring that a Ship Security Assessment is properly carried out, that Ship Security Plans are prepared and submitted for approval by (or on behalf of) the Administration and thereafter is placed on board each ship.

• Ship security officer means the person on board the ship, accountable to the master, designated by the Company as responsible for the security of the ship, including implementation and maintenance of the ship security plan and for liaison with the company security officer and port facility security officers.

• Company security officer means the person designated by the Company for ensuring that a ship security assessment is carried out; that a ship security plan is developed, submitted for approval, and thereafter implemented and maintained and for liaison with port facility security officers and the ship security officer.

11 COMPANY SECURITY OFFICER
11.1 The Company shall designate a company security officer. A person designated as the company security officer may act as the company security officer for one or more ships, depending on the number or types of ships the Company operates provided it is clearly identified for which ships this person is responsible. A Company may, depending on the number or types of ships they operate designate several persons as company security officers provided it is clearly identified for which ships each person is responsible.
11.2 In addition to those specified elsewhere in this Part of the Code, the duties and responsibilities of the company security officer shall include, but are not limited to:
.1 advising the level of threats likely to be encountered by the ship, using appropriate security assessments and other relevant information;
.2 ensuring that ship security assessments are carried out;
.3 ensuring the development, the submission for approval, and thereafter the implementation and maintenance of the ship security plan;
.4 ensuring that the ship security plan is modified, as appropriate, to correct deficiencies and satisfy the security requirements of the individual ship;
.5 arranging for internal audits and reviews of security activities;
.6 arranging for the initial and subsequent verifications of the ship by the Administration or the recognized security organization;
.7 ensuring that deficiencies and non-conformities identified during internal audits, periodic reviews, security inspections and verifications of compliance are promptly addressed and dealt with;
.8 enhancing security awareness and vigilance;
.9 ensuring adequate training for personnel responsible for the security of the ship;
.10 ensuring effective communication and co-operation between the ship security officer and the relevant port facility security officers;
.11 ensuring consistency between security requirements and safety requirements;
.12 ensuring that, if sister-ship or fleet security plans are used, the plan for each ship reflects the ship-specific information accurately; and
.13 ensuring that any alternative or equivalent arrangements approved for a particular ship or group of ships are implemented and maintained.

12 SHIP SECURITY OFFICER
12.1 A ship security officer shall be designated on each ship.
12.2 In addition to those specified elsewhere in this Part of the Code, the duties and responsibilities of the ship security officer shall include, but are not limited to:
.1 undertaking regular security inspections of the ship to ensure that appropriate security measures are maintained;
.2 maintaining and supervising the implementation of the ship security plan, including any amendments to the plan;
.3 co-ordinating the security aspects of the handling of cargo and ship?s stores with other shipboard personnel and with the relevant port facility security officers;
.4 proposing modifications to the ship security plan;
.5 reporting to the company security officer any deficiencies and non-conformities identified during internal audits, periodic reviews, security inspections and verifications of compliance and implementing any corrective actions;
.6 enhancing security awareness and vigilance on board;
.7 ensuring that adequate training has been provided to shipboard personnel, as appropriate;
.8 reporting all security incidents;
.9 co-ordinating implementation of the ship security plan with the company security officer and the relevant port facility security officer; and
.10 ensuring that security equipment is properly operated, tested, calibrated and maintained, if any.
13 TRAINING, DRILLS AND EXERCISES ON SHIP SECURITY
13.1 The company security officer and appropriate shore-based personnel shall have knowledge and have received training, taking into account the guidance given in part B of this Code.
13.2 The ship security officer shall have knowledge and have received training, taking into account the guidance given in part B of this Code.
13.3 Shipboard personnel having specific security duties and responsibilities shall understand their responsibilities for ship security as described in the ship security plan and shall have sufficient knowledge and ability to perform their assigned duties, taking into account the guidance given in part B of this Code.
13.4 To ensure the effective implementation of the ship security plan, drills shall be carried out at appropriate intervals taking into account the ship type, ship personnel changes, port facilities to be visited and other relevant circumstances, taking into account the guidance given in part B of this Code.
13.5 The company security officer shall ensure the effective coordination and implementation of ship security plans by participating in exercises at appropriate intervals, taking into account the guidance given in part B of this Code.

There are 3 levels of threat to a ship, the Contracting Government will set the appropriate security level. Security levels 1, 2, and 3 correspond to normal, medium, and high threat situations, respectively:
• Security level 1 means the level for which minimum appropriate protective security measures shall be maintained at all times.
•Security level 2 means the level for which appropriate additional protective security measures shall be maintained for a period of time as a result of heightened risk of a security incident.
• Security level 3 means the level for which further specific protective security measures shall be maintained for a limited period of time when a security incident is probable or imminent, although it may not be possible to identify the specific target.
Hey Yoo! Don't fall a sleep now. Plenty more coming up!
A ship is required to act upon the security levels set by Contracting Governments as set out below.

• At security level 1, the following activities shall be carried out, through appropriate measures, on all ships, taking into account the guidance given in part B of this Code, in order to identify and take preventive measures against security incidents:
.1 ensuring the performance of all ship security duties;
.2 controlling access to the ship;
.3 controlling the embarkation of persons and their effects;
.4 monitoring restricted areas to ensure that only authorized persons have access;
.5 monitoring of deck areas and areas surrounding the ship;
.6 supervising the handling of cargo and ships stores; and
.7 ensuring that security communication is readily available.

• At security level 2, the additional protective measures, specified in the ship security plan, shall be implemented for each activity detailed in section 7.2, taking into account the guidance given in part B of this Code.

• At security level 3, further specific protective measures, specified in the ship security plan, shall be implemented for each activity detailed in section 7.2, taking into account the guidance given in part B of this Code.

• Whenever security level 2 or 3 is set by the Administration, the ship shall acknowledge receipt of the instructions on change of the security level.

• Prior to entering a port or whilst in a port within the territory of a Contracting Government that has set security level 2 or 3, the ship shall acknowledge receipt of this instruction and shall confirm to the port facility security officer the initiation of the implementation of the appropriate measures and procedures as detailed in the ship security plan, and in the case of security level 3, in instructions issued by the Contracting Government which has set security level 3. The ship shall report any difficulties in implementation. In such cases, the port facility security officer and ship security officer shall liase and co-ordinate the appropriate actions.

• If a ship is required by the Administration to set, or is already at, a higher security level than that set for the port it intends to enter or in which it is already located, then the ship shall advise, without delay, the competent authority of the Contracting Government within whose territory the port facility is located and the port facility security officer of the situation.

• In such cases, the ship security officer shall liaise with the port facility security officer and co-ordinate appropriate actions, if necessary.

• An Administration requiring ships entitled to fly its flag to set security level 2 or 3 in a port of another Contracting Government shall inform that Contracting Government without delay. • When Contracting Governments set security levels and ensure the provision of security level information to ships operating in their territorial sea, or having communicated an intention to enter their territorial sea, such ships shall be advised to maintain vigilance and report immediately to their Administration and any nearby coastal States any information that comes to their attention that might affect maritime security in the area.

• When advising such ships of the applicable security level, a Contracting Government shall, taking into account the guidance given in the part B of this Code, also advise those ships of any security measure that they should take and, if appropriate, of measures that have been taken by the Contracting Government to provide protection against the threat.
I had it!