Birding/ Bird watching in United Kingdom


Saturday 11th of August 2018 and I will start my birding adventure in Liverpool with a group outing with the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds. They have a local RSPB group in Liverpool, visit their web page by clicking HERE

I had sent them an enquiry about a birding guide in the Liverpool area and I was set up with one of their members. And I was also invited to join the group outing in Hoylake

Birding/ Bird watching in United Kingdom

My Guide sent me an RSPB Liverpool field checklist so I know what birds to expect during our 4 days of bird watching in the areas around Liverpool.

My new friend would come to pick me up at 9 o´clock and I spent some time looking for birds in the dock area around the Holiday Inn Ellesmere Port

Birding/ Bird watching in United Kingdom - Mallards - Holiday Inn Ellesmere Port
Mallards outside the restaurant

Mallard, Anas platyrhynchos, Gräsand
Female Mallard


Mallard, Anas platyrhynchos, Gräsand
Mallard Hybride

Mallard, Anas platyrhynchos, Gräsand
Mallard Hybride

Mallard, Anas platyrhynchos, Gräsand
Mallard Hybride

What made me suspicious, it was a very “STUBBY” bird and when
he was close to the females he was very small in comparison



It was suggested by MacNara on BirdForum, thank you, that it could be a Falcated Duck cross.

Forum thread HERE


Birdforum


Birding/ Bird watching in United Kingdom - Holiday Inn Ellesmere Port
Holiday Inn Ellesmere Port

Mute Swan, Cygnus olor, Knölsvan

Mute Swan, Cygnus olor, Knölsvan
Mute Swan / Knölsvan

Mute Swan, Cygnus olor, Knölsvan
Mute Swan / Knölsvan

Mute Swan, Cygnus olor, Knölsvan
Mute Swan / Knölsvan

Birding/ Bird watching in United Kingdom - Holiday Inn Ellesmere Port
A Stolt Tanker passing in the Manchester Ship Canal

My friend arrives at 9 ´clock and we´re soon on our way to Kings Gap Road in Hoylake to meet the other members of the RSBP Liverpool Group to see the waders coming in when the high tide rises.

We are early and we drive along the waterfront and we reach a rocky area of the water front. We discover a lot of Ruddy Turnstones and Common Redshanks and we go out of the car. Almost all of them in breeding plumage. First time I see them in breeding plumage and they are beautiful.

Hoylake - Ruddy Turnstone and Common Redshanks
Ruddy Turnstones and Common Redshanks

Ruddy Turnstone, Arenaria interpres, Roskarl

Ruddy Turnstone, Arenaria interpres, Roskarl
Ruddy Turnstone - Arenaria interpres

Ruddy Turnstone, Arenaria interpres, Roskarl
Ruddy Turnstone - Arenaria interpres

Ruddy Turnstone, Arenaria interpres, Roskarl
Ruddy Turnstone - Arenaria interpres

Hoylake - Ruddy Turnstone and Common Redshanks
Common Redshank and a Ruddy Turnstone takes off

Hoylake - Ruddy Turnstone and Common Redshanks
Ruddy Turnstones and Common Redshanks

Common Redshank, Tringa totanus, Rödbena

Common Redshank, Tringa totanus, Rödbena
Common Redshank / Rödbena

Common Redshank, Tringa totanus, Rödbena
Common Redshank / Rödbena

Birdwatching with RSBP Liverpool Group - Hoylake - Ruddy Turnstone and Common Redshanks
Ruddy Turnstones and Common Redshanks

What a fantastic place this was, more Redshanks than I could have dreamed of. Breeding and non-breeding, Ruddy Turnstones and I also spotted two Dunlins among the birds on the rocks. One in breeding plumage and one that looked to be halfway through the moult to winter plumage.

We started on the street and we tried to be clever and we sneaked towards them behind a wall and we came pretty close and I got some pictures. Trying to get closer and they all took of giving an alarm call, of course, I missed this with my camera.

Dunlin, Calidris alpina, Kärrsnäppa

Yes, we were early for the high tide to rise and we got this bonus experience, what a beautiful start of the day. We drove back to the meeting point for the RSBP outing and now we could see people with binoculars along the street.

Not many people with cameras, mostly binoculars. Like the group I met on Doi Inthanon in Thailand. A group coming from UK to watch birds, only binoculars and no one had a camera. And all of them were looking at the Blue Whistling Thrush

We got out of the car and we could hardly see the ocean. And no birds around, all of them out on the mudflats looking for birds. We met the other members and I guess that we were around 30 people there looking for birds. My new friend told me that maybe 20 of them were members in RSBP. But it was a good turnout.

Birdwatching with RSBP Liverpool Group - Hoylake
Low tide and sand for long as we can see

Birdwatching with RSBP Liverpool Group - Hoylake
Information board

Birdwatching with RSBP Liverpool Group - Hoylake
Hoylake waterfront

Birdwatching with RSBP Liverpool Group - Hoylake
RSBP Liverpool Group waiting for the high tide

Birdwatching with RSBP Liverpool Group - Hoylake
High tide is coming in and we can see plenty Oystercatchers

Birdwatching with RSBP Liverpool Group - Hoylake
RSBP Liverpool Group waiting for the high tide

I was looking for birds in the bushes while waiting for the high tide to come in and I saw a few small birds but never any pictures. My new friend discovered a rare bird but he was very scared and I never got any pictures, anyway, not any pictures worth saving.

Seems like forever for the high tide to hit the beach, but it was very quickly as soon as the water was approaching. Looked very nice with all the Oystercatchers walking ahead of the water escaping the high tide. Of course, also looking for food.

Oystercatchers coming in with the tide

Back home and I discover that the video files and many pictures are damaged. I only got a few seconds out of my Oystercatcher video. And the pictures, half of them were in white stripes.

Birdwatching with RSBP Liverpool Group - Hoylake
Oystercatchers coming in with the tide

Birdwatching with RSBP Liverpool Group - Hoylake
Oystercatchers coming in with the tide


Mudflats

or mud flats, also known as tidal flats, are coastal wetlands that form when mud is deposited by tides or rivers. They are found in sheltered areas such as bays, bayous, lagoons, and estuaries. Mudflats may be viewed geologically as exposed layers of bay mud, resulting from deposition of estuarine silts, clays and marine animal detritus. Most of the sediment within a mudflat is within the intertidal zone, and thus the flat is submerged and exposed approximately twice daily.

In the past tidal flats were considered unhealthy, economically unimportant areas and were often dredged and developed into agricultural land. Several especially shallow mudflat areas, such as the Wadden Sea, are now popular among those practising the sport of mudflat hiking.

On the Baltic Sea coast of Germany in places, mudflats are exposed not by tidal action, but by wind-action driving water away from the shallows into the sea. These wind-affected mudflats are called windwatts in German.

Mudflats
CLICK HERE FOR BIGGER PICTURE
General sketch-map of a tidal plain, showing the typical tripartition in supratidal, intertidal and subtidal zones.

The most apparent character of the area is the development of tidal channels, affecting mainly the intertidal zone. In this case, the tidal flat is protected seaward by a beach barrier, but in many cases (low-energy waves and longshore currents) the tidal flats may directly pass into a shallow marine environment.
Foxbat deinos - Own work


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Birdwatching with RSBP Liverpool Group - Hoylake
A Falcon is flying over us, and we can see how the picture is destroyed

Birdwatching with RSBP Liverpool Group - Hoylake
High tide is coming in pushing the birds towards shore

Birdwatching with RSBP Liverpool Group - Hoylake
High tide is coming in pushing the birds towards shore

RNLI - Royal National Lifeboat Institution


RNLI - Royal National Lifeboat Institution have a Lifeboat Station just next to where we were looking at the birds. And they took out their boat for some exercise.

Hoylake Lifeboat Station

Established in 1803, Hoylake is one of the oldest lifeboat stations in the UK, although its boathouse and Shannon class lifeboat are state-of-the-art. It covers Liverpool Bay and the approaches to the River Mersey and River Dee.

From https://rnli.org/

Hoylake Lifeboat Station - RNLI - Royal National Lifeboat Institution
RNLI - Royal National Lifeboat Institution training with their lifeboat

Birdwatching with RSBP Liverpool Group - Hoylake
Not much beach remaining for the birds

Birdwatching with RSBP Liverpool Group - Hoylake

Birdwatching with RSBP Liverpool Group - Hoylake
We saw a few Little Egrets

Birdwatching with RSBP Liverpool Group - Hoylake
I think this is a group of Black-tailed Godwits

Birdwatching with RSBP Liverpool Group - Hoylake
I think this is a group of Black-tailed Godwits

The high water arrived and there were just a few meters of sand remaining below the street. We had decided to continue the outing as everyone wanted to continue. RSBP have a bird protection area at Burton. RSPB Burton Mere Wetlands and we decided to go there to have a look for birds. My new friend had brought picnic lunch that we enjoyed on the street next to the car watching the gulls on the narrow sand stretch between the stone wall below the street and the water.

We saw Black-headed Gulls and European Herring Gulls and I got a few pictures of the gulls before we left for RSPB Burton Mere Wetlands.

Black-headed gull, Chroicocephalus ridibundus, Skrattmås

Black-headed gull, Chroicocephalus ridibundus, Skrattmås
Black-headed gull / Skrattmås

European Herring Gull, Larus argentatus, Gråtrut
European Herring Gull / Gråtrut


European Herring Gull, Larus argentatus, Gråtrut
European Herring Gull - Juvenile
Hoylake, United Kingdom - August 2018

European Herring Gull, Larus argentatus, Gråtrut
European Herring Gull - Juvenile
Hoylake, United Kingdom - August 2018

European Herring Gull, Larus argentatus, Gråtrut
European Herring Gull - Going for 3rd winter
Hoylake, United Kingdom - August 2018


Nutcracker at Birdforum explained the different cycles for me very nicely:

The plumage progression in large gulls is:
1 egg
2 hatches; downy feathers (0-1 month old)
3 juvenile plumage (1 to 4 or 5 months old, a bit longer in some: Glaucous Gull up to about 10 months?), then a partial moult (mainly mantle feathers)
4 first winter (up to about 10 months old), then a partial moult (small body feathers but not flight feathers)
5 first summer (up to about 16 months old), then a complete moult (including flight feathers)
6 second winter (up to about 22 months old)
7 second summer (up to about 28 months old)
8 ... and so on!


Thanks to Nutcracker, CAREY and lou salomon at Birdforum for help with the different plumages, I learned a lot. Mostly that I have a lot more to learn!

Forum thread HERE


Birdforum



Thanks to lou salomon at Birdforum for the link to the webpage http://gull-research.org/ for everytning you need to know about gullas and their different plumages.


Birdwatching with RSBP Liverpool Group - RSPB Burton Mere Wetlands
Reception hide at RSPB Burton Mere Wetlands

Burton Mere Wetlands

is a nature reserve on the Dee Estuary straddling the border between Cheshire, England and Flintshire, Wales. It is run by the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB) and incorporates the older Inner Marsh Farm reserve. It lies near the village of Burton, about 3 kilometres south of Neston. It has all been developed by the RSPB and includes a large area of mixed wetland habitats, bluebell woodlands, and arable fields all managed to attract wildlife.

The reserve is open from 9am until 9pm (or dusk if sooner) and the reception hide is open from 9:30am until 5pm. There is a charge for non-members of the RSPB.

History
The site consisted of tidal mudflats until the late 19th century when it was reclaimed during the building of the Wrexham to Bidston railway line. The resulting land was used for grazing and duck shooting and was later used for arable farming.

The RSPB bought land for the original Inner Marsh Farm reserve in 1986 and the reserve opened in June 1992. Three shallow, freshwater pools were created as well as a footpath leading to a hide overlooking the pools. Because of restrictions from the local council, the RSPB did not publicise the reserve and access was originally for members only. The reserve was closed on Tuesdays for essential maintenance. There was a small car park at the end of an untarmacked road, signposted for Burton Point Farm, off Station Road.

The reserve was enlarged by the purchase of land at Burton Marsh Farm in 2006 and Burton Mere Fisheries in 2008. New wetland areas were created along with additional visitor facilities including a reception hide, toilet block and a new entrance and car park. The reserve was renamed Burton Mere Wetlands in September 2011 when the new section was officially opened by the television presenter and naturalist Iolo Williams. Further paths and screens including a path linking the old and new sections of the reserve were opened in April 2014.

Wildlife
Birds include a variety of waders through the winter and migration seasons including significant numbers of black-tailed godwit, spotted redshank, greenshank and ruff. Winter also brings many ducks including pintail, shoveller, teal and wigeon, as well as small numbers of Bewick's swan and whooper swan.

Birds of prey can be seen over the marsh, from the reserve or from nearby Denhall Lane; these include short-eared owl, hen harrier, marsh harrier, merlin, kestrel and peregrine falcon.

Breeding birds include good numbers of nationally declining waders such as lapwing and redshank. Avocet also breed on the new pools. Yellow wagtail, skylark, sedge warbler, reed warbler, lesser whitethroat, grasshopper warbler and reed bunting all occur. A colony of little egrets and grey herons breeds in a nearby wood.

Mammals on the reserve include harvest mouse, water vole and European hare. Daubenton's bats feed over the wetlands. Insects include the wall brown butterfly and the red-eyed damselfly.

The pools on the reserve are surrounded by reedmace, sea club-rush, grey club-rush, soft rush and hard rush. Areas of damp grassland contain marsh foxtail, floating sweet-grass, creeping bent and soft rush. Wild flowers include marsh marigold and fleabane. Whilst wild orchids such as southern marsh orchid can be found in abundance, bee orchids are also present

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The gateway to the Dee Estuary reserve, Burton Mere Wetlands straddles the border between England and Wales with a mosaic of freshwater wetland habitats, mixed farmland and woodland. The area is bursting with wildlife, hosting avocets, egrets, harriers, noisy redshanks, swallows and swifts. Read more HERE

Birdwatching with RSBP Liverpool Group - RSPB Burton Mere Wetlands

Find your way around Burton Mere Wetlands with this trail map and information from RSBP, click HERE The nature reserve is very well worth visiting.

We drove to RSPB Burton Mere Wetlands and we parked the car. We walked 50 meters to a RSBP hide overlooking the wetland with some mudflats just below the hide. It was an impressive hide with glass walls facing the wetland. They were serving tea and snacks and they had souvenirs. And heating available for the winter.

They had a few feeders outside and there were some interesting birds coming to eat.

Birdwatching with RSBP Liverpool Group - RSPB Burton Mere Wetlands
Walking the trails at RSPB Burton Mere Wetlands

Birdwatching with RSBP Liverpool Group - RSPB Burton Mere Wetlands
Walking the trails at RSPB Burton Mere Wetlands

Common Moorhen, Gallinula chloropus, Rörhöna

Common Moorhen, Gallinula chloropus, Rörhöna
Common Moorhen

Birdwatching with RSBP Liverpool Group - RSPB Burton Mere Wetlands
Passing a hide along the trails at RSPB Burton Mere Wetlands

Birdwatching with RSBP Liverpool Group - RSPB Burton Mere Wetlands

Birdwatching with RSBP Liverpool Group - RSPB Burton Mere Wetlands
Another hide at RSPB Burton Mere Wetlands
Common Moorhen

Common Moorhen, Gallinula chloropus, Rörhöna at RSPB Burton Mere Wetlands
Common Moorhen at RSPB Burton Mere Wetlands

Cattle Egret, Bubulcus ibis
Cattle Egret at RSPB Burton Mere Wetlands

Grey Heron at RSPB Burton Mere Wetlands
Grey Heron at RSPB Burton Mere Wetlands

Grey Heron at RSPB Burton Mere Wetlands
Grey Heron at RSPB Burton Mere Wetlands

Grey Heron at RSPB Burton Mere Wetlands
Grey Heron at RSPB Burton Mere Wetlands

Mallard, Anas platyrhynchos, Gräsand at RSPB Burton Mere Wetlands
Mallards feeding at RSPB Burton Mere Wetlands

We walked around the area and we even spotted one Cattle Egret, more and more common in UK, but still rare and there were some bird watchers that had come here just to see the Cattle Egret.

Back at the reception hide and I stopped at the feeder and I spotted a beautiful Eurasian Blue Tit and I managed to get a few pictures. We spotted many waders on the mudflats in front of the reception hide. My new friends were enjoying the reception hide and I went back to the feeder to see if I could get any more bird pictures.

Eurasian Blue Tit, Cyanistes caeruleus, Blåmes

Eurasian Blue Tit, Cyanistes caeruleus, Blåmes
Eurasian Blue Tit/ Blåmes

Eurasian Blue Tit, Cyanistes caeruleus, Blåmes
Eurasian Blue Tit/ Blåmes

Eurasian Blue Tit, Cyanistes caeruleus, Blåmes
Eurasian Blue Tit/ Blåmes

Eurasian Blue Tit, Cyanistes caeruleus, Blåmes
Eurasian Blue Tit/ Blåmes

Eurasian Blue Tit, Cyanistes caeruleus, Blåmes
Eurasian Blue Tit/ Blåmes

Eurasian Blue Tit, Cyanistes caeruleus, Blåmes
Eurasian Blue Tit/ Blåmes

Eurasian Blue Tit, Cyanistes caeruleus, Blåmes
Eurasian Blue Tit/ Blåmes

We had have a lovely day and it was time to return to Holiday Inn Ellesmere Port. My new friend will come to pick me up tomorrow morning and we will go to Parkgate for the Hen Harrier Day. I decided to go look at the Mute Swan nest. I had been there this morning but he swans looked a little bit angry, and very big. So I gave up the idea to have a photo of the nest.

Nesting is over, but they are still around the nest with 2 eggs. The eggs are dead as the babies would have been born a few months ago. But they will use the nest next year and they guard the nest. Anyway, now I was lucky, the swans were not around the nest and I got a few pictures.

Mute Swan nest
Mute Swan nest

Mute Swan nest
Mute Swan nest

Mute Swan nest
Mute Swan nest

Birding/ Bird watching in United Kingdom - Holiday Inn Ellesmere Port
Holiday Inn Ellesmere Port

I spent the rest of the day in my room looking at the pictures I had taken during the day. I was very happy to have seen the Ruddy Turnstone and the Redshank. And the Blue Tit had been fantastic. Anyway, my new friend will come to pck me up tomorrow morning and we will go to Parkgate for the Hen HArrier day. So just click HERE to find out how that turns out.

Svenska Dagbladet
Svenska Dagbladet

Everyday life in Sweden HD
Meanwhile, the old Swedish people in the elderly care starve to death


Elderly Swedes starving
What a shame!


Well, and everything he says is true
Sweden is already beyond rescue

Sverigedemokraterna




       
                  
OK, it has come to my knowledge that we have senior citizens visiting my web page. How hard can it be? So it's not very easy for them to see the blue coloured links to the next page.
Jiffy (also jiff)

noun [in SING.] informal a moment: we'll be back in a jiffy.

ORIGIN late 18th cent.: of unknown origin.

So as you understand, in a jiff pretty much depends on your internet.
So I put a “Next” button here and I hope that there isn't any problem to understand how to use that one. So just CLICK the “Next” button on your left hand side and you will be on the next page in a jiff!

Marunong ka mag-tagalog? Walang problema! Magpunta sa kabilang pahina pindutin ang “NEXT” button sa itaas

Faites vous parlez le français? Pas de problème! Pour arriver à la page suivante faites s'il vous plaît un déclic le bouton “Next” ci-dessus!

Haga usted dice el español? No hay problema! Ver la siguiente página sólo hacer clic el botón “Next” encima!

Farla parla l'italiano? Non problemi! Per vedere la prossima pagina lo scatto per favore giusto Il bottone “Next” sopra

Sprechen sie Deutsch! Kein problem! Wenn Sie die folgende Seite sehen wollen gerade klicken der Knopf “Next” oben!

คุณพูดภาษาไทยได้ไหม ไม่มีปัญหา ถ้าคุณต้องการไปหน้าถัดไป ให้กดปุ่ม “Next” ข้างบนนี้

Вы говорите по-русски? Просто нажмите синюю кнопку "Next" с левой стороны и Вы моментально переместитесь на следующую страницу!

E ni Svenskar och inte förstår Engelska så ska ni skämmas. J och Björn, med det menar jag inte att alla mina stavfel ska ältas varje gång vi träffas.

Flag of Skåne / Skånska flaggan Well, the flag of Skåne, just a BONUS flag.


                                       

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