PLEASE! If you see any mistakes, I'm 100% sure that I have wrongly identified some birds.
So please let me know on my guestbook at the bottom of the page
Bronze-winged Jacana, Metopidius indicus, นกพริก

The Bronze-winged Jacana (Metopidius indicus) is a wader in the family Jacanidae. It is the only member of the genus Metopidius. It has huge feet and claws which enables it to walk on floating vegetation in shallow lakes that are its preferred habitat. It is found in south and east Asia within the tropical zone.

The Bronze-winged Jacana breeds in India and southeast Asia. It is sedentary apart from seasonal dispersion. It lays four black-marked brown eggs in a floating nest. The males, as in some other wader families like the phalaropes, take responsibility for incubation.

Bronze-winged Jacana, Metopidius indicus, นกพริก
Distribution map by L. Shyamal

These are conspicuous and unmistakable birds. They are 29 cm long, but the females are larger than the males. They are mainly black, although the inner wings are very dark brown and the tail is red. There is a striking white eyestripe. The yellow bill extends up as a red coot-like frontal shield, and the legs and very long toes are grey.

Young birds have brown upperparts. Their underparts are white, with a buff foreneck.

The Bronze-winged Jacana's feeds on insects and other invertebrates picked from the floating vegetation or the water's surface.

Call is a wheezy piping seek-seek-seek given mostly in alarm.

When forced they sometimes choose to hide by submerging themselves. The male may carry chicks between the wings and body.

Measurements (from Rasmussen and Anderton, 2005)

• Length 280–310 mm

• Wing 150–197 mm (males 150-180mm, females 167–187 mm)

• Bill from tip to top of frontal shield 34–46 mm (adults) 32-38 (juveniles)

• Tarsus 61–76 mm

• Tail 40–52 mm


Length: 31 cm
Wingspan: 54 cm
Weight: 147 - 354 g
Longevity:
Distinctive Feature

Similar Species



From opus at www.birdforum.net
Female / Male / Juvenile

• Juvenile
Brown upperparts
White underparts
Buff foreneck

From opus at www.birdforum.net

Taxonomy
The Bronze-winged Jacana was formally described by the English ornithologist John Latham in 1790 and given the binomial name Parra indicus. Latham had earlier included the species in a supplement to his A General Synopsis of Birds but had not coined a scientific name. The present genus Metopidius was introduced by the German zoologist Johann Georg Wagler in 1832.

The Bronze-winged Jacana is the only species within the genus. The name Metopidius is from the Ancient Greek word metōpidios meaning "on the forehead". The specific epithet indicus is the Latin word for "Indian". There are no recognised subspecies.

Mating System
Bronze-winged Jacanas have a territorial, sex-role reversed system. They are polyandrous, and the females are larger and more brightly colored than their male counterparts. The females compete with each other for harems of males to incubate their clutches of eggs. Each female’s territory encompasses one to four males and their individual territories.

The density of breeding territories can be limited by habitat availability and the territorial competition with other females and their harems.

Although there is no clear evidence for a relationship between male territory size and the distribution of available resources, heavier males have been shown to defend their territories from other males. The overall distribution of territories appears to be small areas controlled by individual males, with the harems of females encompassing one or more of the male territories.

Even though the territory size of females is positively correlated with the size of their harems, it does not seem to be related to the overall quality of the habitat.

Females could attempt to maximize harem size by including as many male territories as they can, while males in larger harems would have to defend smaller territories. As a result, the degree of polyandry of the Bronze-winged Jacana is dependent on the territory sizes of males and females.

The breeding system of the Bronze-winged Jacana leads to intense sperm competition, as female jacanas copulate with multiple males prior to laying their clutch. Before laying the clutch, the female would spend more time with the specific male that would receive the clutch (called the “receiver”). Studies have also shown that receivers gain more copulations than non-receivers.

Since the receivers provide all of the parental care, females should, in theory, comply with male demands for copulations to convince them of their paternity, so they will care for the clutch. Receivers have been observed to destroy clutches in which they only had a low share of the paternity.

Although females offer copulations to non-receiver males in order to maintain their presence in her harem, these copulations are less important than copulations to assure the receivers of their paternity.

The cost of clutches being destroyed by receivers is much higher than losing males from her harem.

Since the males have no individual control over the maximum number of their copulations, the males in polyandrous harems vie for the female’s attention through a call, called a "yell", to attract her and gain sexual access. It has been shown that male jacanas in larger harems yelled at higher rates during the periods of time when all copulations took place, while males that already received their clutch or were involved in chick care yelled at lower and rates.

These yells attracted the female bronze-winged Jacana when she is far from the yeller. A study showed that females seem to use yells to assess male quality, as the males that yelled at the highest rates were able to receive the greatest number of copulations. Females may also respond to the yells of males in their territory since they could attract other females who could intrude on their territory.

Bronze-winged Jacana, Metopidius indicus, นกพริก
Bronze-winged Jacana eating a grasshopper - Click HERE for full size picture

Feeding
Bronze-winged Jacana (Metopidius indicus) immature, Chambal River, Uttar Pradesh, India. A composite of 8 images shot over 30 seconds in a sequence showing the bird deal with a grasshopper. Many bird species, particularly those in captivity and those eating human food, dunk food in water, often to soften it. Adult birds have also been observed dunking insects in water to moisten them when feeding their young.

One possible explanation for this particular behaviour (which may be new to science) is that the immature bird is mimicing its parent's behaviour, although jacanas are precocial. Another possible explanation comes from the knowledge that this bird lives on the banks of the Chambal River and has to feed on land at this time of year.

Jacanas usually feed in standing water and move around on lily pads (hence the nickname of Jesus birds as they appear to walk on water) catching insects which are much more likely to be wet. The bird is unlikley to be trying to drown the grasshopper. It doesn't hold it under water. The grasshopper is still alive as it has moved between images 5 and 6.

Listen to the Bronze-winged Jacana




Conservation status
Bronze-winged Jacana, Metopidius indicus, นกพริก
Least Concern (IUCN 3.1)
IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2013.2.
International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 26 November 2013.



From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

www.birdforum.net


Sighted: (Date of first photo that I could use) 13th of February 2016
Location: Petchaburi Rice Fields


Among others I have used Peter Ericsson's web page Birds of Thailand These galleries contain 668 species of the Birds of Thailand and have been of a great help to identify some of the birds as the birds in Thailand and India are, well, many of them are the same.

PLEASE! As I'm a first time birdwatcher bear in mind that some of the bird can be wrongly named. I have bought book and I confirm on the internet to get the right identity on the birds I take pictures off. But there can still be mistakes.

Bronze-winged Jacana, Metopidius indicus, นกพริก
Bronze-winged Jacana / นกพริก - 13th of February 2016 - Petchaburi Rice Fields

Bronze-winged Jacana, Metopidius indicus, นกพริก
Bronze-winged Jacana / นกพริก - 1 May 2020 - Praek Nam Daeng, Samut Songkhram

Bronze-winged Jacana, Metopidius indicus, นกพริก
Bronze-winged Jacana / นกพริก - 1 May 2020 - Praek Nam Daeng, Samut Songkhram

Bronze-winged Jacana, Metopidius indicus, นกพริก
Bronze-winged Jacana / นกพริก - 9 June 2020 - Nong Pla Lai paddies, Phetchaburi

Bronze-winged Jacana, Metopidius indicus, นกพริก
Bronze-winged Jacana / นกพริก - 2 August 2020 <
2 August 2020 - eBird hotspot: Bang Yai garbage dump and wetlands, Nonthaburi

Bronze-winged Jacana, Metopidius indicus, นกพริก
Bronze-winged Jacana / นกพริก - 2 August 2020
2 August 2020 - eBird hotspot: Bang Yai garbage dump and wetlands, Nonthaburi

Bronze-winged Jacana, Metopidius indicus, นกพริก
Bronze-winged Jacana / นกพริก - 2 August 2020
2 August 2020 - eBird hotspot: Bang Yai garbage dump and wetlands, Nonthaburi

Bronze-winged Jacana, Metopidius indicus, นกพริก
Bronze-winged Jacana / นกพริก - 2 August 2020
2 August 2020 - eBird hotspot: Bang Yai garbage dump and wetlands, Nonthaburi

Bronze-winged Jacana, Metopidius indicus, นกพริก
Bronze-winged Jacana / นกพริก - 2 August 2020
2 August 2020 - eBird hotspot: Bang Yai garbage dump and wetlands, Nonthaburi



PLEASE! If I have made any mistakes identifying any bird, PLEASE let me know on my guestbook



       
                  



                                       
You are visitor no.
To www.aladdin.st since December 2005

Visitors from different countries since 26th of September 2011